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Thread: On this day.

  1. #51
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    Default On This day 17 May

    ...absolutely nothing happened.

    ;)

  2. #52

    Default

    But we cant deal with a void so:

    1814 Denmark cedes Norway to Sweden (National Day)
    1814 Norwegian constitution passed by constitutent assembly at Eidsvoll
    1809 Papal States annexed by France
    1804 Lewis and Clark begin exploration of Louisiana Purchase
    1803 John Hawkins and Richard French patent the Reaping Machine
    1794 Hard frost in southern New England
    1792 24 merchants form New York Stock Exchange at 70 Wall Street
    1787 English slave ship Sisters, from Africa to Cuba, capsizes
    1756 Britain declares war on France (7 Years' or French and Indian War)
    1750 Tax revolt in Gorinchem
    1744 French army takes Austrian Netherlands
    1742 Frederick great (Emperor of Prussia) beats Austrians
    1733 England passes Molasses Act, putting high tariffs on rum and molasses imported to the colonies from a country other than British possessions
    1712 Maximilian Emanuel of Bavaria honored as "sovereign of Netherlands"
    1678 King Charles II and Louis XIV sign secret treaty
    1673 Louis Joliet and Jacques Marquette begin exploring Mississippi
    1672 Frontenac becomes governor of New France (Canada)
    1648 Emperor Ferdinand III defeats Maximilian I of Bavaria
    1631 Earl Johann Tilly attacks Maagdenburg
    1630 Italian Jesuit Niccolo Zucchi, 1st to see 2 belts on Jupiter surface
    1620 1st merry-go-round seen at a fair (Philippapolis, Turkey)
    1579 Artois/Henegouwen/French-Flanders sign Treaty/Peace of Parma recognizing Spanish duke van Parma as land guardian
    1544 Scottish earl Matthew van Lennox signs secret treaty with Henry VIII
    1536 Anne Boleyns 4 "lovers" executed
    1527 Panfilo de Narvaez departs to explore Florida
    1525 Battle at Zabern: duke of Lutherans beats rebels
    884 St. Adrian III begins his reign as Catholic Pope
    352 Liberius begins his reign as Catholic Pope replacing Julius I
    218 7th recorded perihelion passage of Halley's Comet

  3. #53

    Default On This Day 18 May

    On 18 May 1803 the 36-gun frigate HMS Doris, under the command of Captain Richard Harrison Pearson, captured the French naval lugger Affronteur, off Ushant. Affronteur was armed with fourteen 9-pounder guns and had a crew of 92 men under the command of Lieutenant de Vaisseau M. Morce André Dutoya. Capturing Affronteur required an engagement during which Doris suffered one man wounded, while Affronteur lost Dutoya and eight men killed, and 14 men wounded, one of whom died shortly thereafter. Affronteur became the hired armed vessel Caroline.
    Last edited by Coog; 05-18-2012 at 16:18.

  4. #54
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    Also:
    1775 - Benedict Arnold captures British sloop and renames her Enterprise, first of many famous ships with that name.

    The First (US)

    The first Enterprise, a British supply sloop, was captured 18 May 1775 at St. Johns, Quebec, Canada, by Col B. Arnold, named Enterprise, and armed for use on Lake Champlain.

    On 28 August 1775, Enterprise and other vessels embarked more than 1000 troops as part of an expedition against St. Johns, Montreal, and Quebec. Though St. Johns and Montreal were captured, and Quebec was besieged, the arrival of strong British reinforcements forced the Americans to withdraw from Canada in the spring of 1776. Enterprise and the other craft sailed to Isle aux Noix in the Richelieu River where they waited while Arnold directed the building of a fleet at Ticonderoga and Skenesborough (Whitehall), and the British-built ships at St. Johns.

    The battle was finally joined on 11 October 1776 at Valcour Island, near Plattsburg, N.Y. Arnold chose the site and deployed to await the British advance. Though markedly inferior in firepower, Arnold's fleet fought a valiant and effective action all day long, then slipped through the British line after dark. A running battle took place over the next 2 days, and resulted in the loss of all but five of the American ships. Enterprise and four others escaped to Crown Point, then sailed on to Ticonderoga. A tactical defeat, Valcour Island was nevertheless a great strategic victory for the Americans. Arnold and his little fleet so disrupted the British invasion into New York that it was nearly a year before the advance could be renewed. In that interval American troops were recruited an trained, and on 17 October 1777, under General Horatio Gates, defeated the British decisively at Saratoga, N.Y. This victory was a primary factor in bringing about the alliance with France, and bringing the powerful French navy to the aid of the Colonies.

    During the British advance prior to the Battle of Saratoga, Enterprise was one of the five vessels assigned to duty convoying bateaux in the evacuation of Ticonderoga. The small American force was no match for the British fleet on Lake Champlain, and after two ships had been captured, Enterprise and the other two were run aground on 7 July 1777, and burned to prevent their capture.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anav View Post
    Also:
    1775 - Benedict Arnold captures British sloop and renames her Enterprise, first of many famous ships with that name.
    One of all-too-many events for which he never received due credit, leading to his changing sides.

  6. #56
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    Default May 20th

    1801 - Four warships sent to Mediterranean to protect American commerce.
    1815 - Commodore Stephen Decatur (Frigate Guerriere) sails with 10 ships to suppress Mediterranean pirate raids on U.S. shipping.
    1844 - USS Constitution sails from New York on 'round-the-world cruise.

  7. #57

    Default On This Day 23 May

    On 23 May 1813, the Virginia privateer schooner Roger departed Norfolk under Captain Roger Quarles, an experienced merchant seaman. The 188 ton vessel carried 14 guns and 120 men. Some days after leaving Norfolk, Roger and the schooner HMS Highflyer encountered each other and an indecisive, though prolonged, fight ensued. At the time of this encounter, Highflyer carried five guns and a crew of 50. After suffering the death of her captain, Lieutenant Theophilus Lewis, and two other men, as well as twelve men wounded (two of whom would die later), as well as damage to her sails, Highflyer was unable to pursue Roger as she sailed off.

  8. #58

    Default

    William Kidd, the pirate Captain Kidd, was hanged on 23 May 1701, at 'Execution Dock', Wapping, in London. During the execution, the hangman's rope broke and Kidd was hanged on the second attempt. His body was gibbeted—left to hang in an iron cage over the River Thames at Tilbury Point—as a warning to future would-be pirates for three years.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coog View Post
    William Kidd, the pirate Captain Kidd, was hanged on 23 May 1701, at 'Execution Dock', Wapping, in London. During the execution, the hangman's rope broke and Kidd was hanged on the second attempt. His body was gibbeted—left to hang in an iron cage over the River Thames at Tilbury Point—as a warning to future would-be pirates for three years.
    Except he wasn't actually a pirate -- he was stunningly-unsuccessful (and unlucky) privateer; for all practical purposes, when he returned from his voyage with nothing to show his sponsors for it, he was judicially murdered so he couldn't name his backers.

  10. #60
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    Default May 29th

    ‎1781 - Frigate Alliance captures HMS Atalanta and Trepassy off Nova Scotia.

    After spending two days looking for her lost charge, Alliance continued on toward America alone. On 2 May, she took two sugar-laden Jamaicamen. Off Newfoundland Banks later that day, the frigate sighted, but escaped the attention of a large convoy from Jamaica and its Royal Navy escorts. Ironically, a few days before, the missing Marquis De Lafayette and her treacherous master had fallen prey to this same British force.

    Almost continuous bad weather plagued Barry's little force in the days that followed until Alliance permanently lost sight of her two prizes on 12 May. During a tempest on the 17th, lightning shattered the frigate's main topmast and carried away her main yard while damaging her foremast and injuring almost a score of men.

    Jury-rigged repairs had been completed when Barry observed two vessels approaching him from windward 10 days later but his ship was still far from her best fighting trim. The two strangers kept pace with Alliance roughly a league off her starboard beam. At first dawn, they hoisted British colors and prepared for battle. Although all three ships were almost completely becalmed, the American drifted within hailing distance of larger vessel about an hour before noon; Barry learned that was the sloop of war HMS Atalanta. Her smaller consort proved to be Trepassey, also a sloop of war. The American captain then identified his own vessel and invited Atalanta's commanding officer to surrender. A few moments later, Barry opened the inevitable battle with a broadside. The sloops immediately pulled out of field of fire of the frigate's broadsides and took positions aft of their foe where their guns could pound her with near impunity In the motionless air, Alliance - too large to be propelled by sweeps - was powerless to maneuver.

    A grapeshot hit Barry's left shoulder, seriously wounding him, but he continued to direct the fighting until loss of blood almost robbed him of consciousness. Capt. Hoystead Hacker, the frigate's executive officer, took command as Barry was carried to the cockpit for treatment. Hacker fought the ship with valor and determination until her inability to maneuver out of her relatively defenseless position prompted him to seek Barry's permission to surrender. Indignantly, the wounded captain refused to allow this and asked to be brought back on deck to resume command.

    Inspired by Barry's zeal, Hacker returned to the fray. Then a wind sprang up and restored the battered frigate's steerage way, enabling her to bring her battery back into action. Two devastating broadsides knocked Trepassey out of the fight. Another broadside forced Atalanta to strike, ending the bloody affair. The next day, while carpenters labored to repair all three ships, Barry transferred all of his prisoners to Trepassey which - as a cartel ship - would carry them to St. John's, Newfoundland, to be exchanged for American prisoners. HMS Charlestown recaptured Atalanta in June and sent her into Halifax.

    Temporary repairs to Atalanta ended on the last day of May, and the prize got underway for Boston. After more patching her battered hull and rigging, Alliance set out the next day and reached Boston on 6 June. While Barry recuperated, her repairs were again delayed by want of funds. Lord Cornwallis surrendered his army at Yorktown, ending the war's last major action on land, but not the war, well before she was ready for sea. As had happened before, her restoration to service was hastened by decision to use the frigate to carry an important person to France. Lafayette - who had completed his work in America with a major role in the Yorktown campaign - arrived in Boston on 10 December 1781, wanting to return home. Even with the aid of the Marquis' great influence, a full fortnight passed before she could put to sea on Christmas Eve 1781.


    And its my Birthday!!

  11. #61

    Default

    The 28-gun HMS Carysfort under Captain Francis Laforey was cruising the Eastern Atlantic for signs of a French convoy when on 29 May 1794 lookouts sighted two sails ahead. Laforey immediately advanced on the strange sails, which were soon revealed to be the 32-gun French frigate Castor, Captain L'Huillier in command, towing a Dutch merchant ship. With Carysfort bearing down on him L'Huillier cast off the tow and prepared for battle, meeting the approaching British frigate with a broadside. The engagement was fought at close range and with little manoeuvering by either side, the ships exchanging broadsides for an hour and fifteen minutes before L'Huillier surrendered. His ship was heavily battered in the exchange, with the main topgallantmast knocked down and the mainmast and hull severely damaged. Carysfort suffered just one man killed and four wounded from the understrength crew of 180, while casualties were much heavier among the approximately 200 men aboard Castor, the French losing 16 men killed and nine wounded. The Dutch ship initially escaped, but was later captured and its value was eventually included in the prize money paid for Castor.

    Laforey's success was considered impressive by historian William James, as his ship carried only 28 nine-pounder cannon in contrast with L'Huillier' 32 twelve-pounder guns and four 24-pounder carronades. Castor was also a larger ship with a slightly larger crew, and although L'Huillier and his men had only been aboard for ten days, the crew of Carysfort had only come together immediately before the cruise and had not had much longer to become acquainted with their vessel than the French crew.

  12. #62

    Default

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY STEVE!

  13. #63

    Default

    Hey Happy Birthday Steve..something to celebrate on the site:)

  14. #64

    Default On This Day 30 May

    The Treaty of Paris, signed on 30 May 1814, ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition, part of the Napoleonic Wars, following an armistice signed on 23 May between Charles, Count of Artois, and the allies. It established peace between France and the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, and Prussia, who in March had defined their common war aim in Chaumont, and was also signed by Portugal and Sweden. Spain signed later in July. Peace talks had started on 9 May between Talleyrand, who negotiated for the exiled Bourbon king Louis XVIII of France, and the allies of Chaumont, who had agreed to reduce France to her 1792 borders and restore the independence of her neighbors after Napoleon Bonaparte's defeat. The allied parties did not sign a common document, but instead concluded separate treaties with France allowing for specific amendments.

    In addition to the cession of hostilities, the treaty provided a rough draft of a final settlement, which according to article 32 was to be concluded within the next two months at a congress involving all belligerents of the Napoleonic Wars. This provision resulted in the Congress of Vienna, held between September 1814 and June 1815. The preliminary conditions already agreed on in Paris were moderate for France to not disturb the re-enthronement of the returned Bourbon king: France' borders of 1 June 1792 were confirmed, and in addition, she was allowed to retain Saarbrücken, Saarlouis, Landau, the County of Montbéliard, part of Savoy with Annecy and Chambéry, also Avignon and the Comtat Venaissin as well as artifacts acquired during the war, while on the other hand she had to cede several colonies.

    To distinguish this agreement from a second treaty of Paris, concluded on 20 November 1815 as one of the treaties amending Vienna, the treaty of 30 May 1814 is sometimes referred to as the First Peace of Paris.

  15. #65
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    Thanks!!

  16. #66

    Default On This Day 2 June

    The naval Battle of Palermo took place on 2 June 1676 during the Franco-Dutch War, between a French force led by Abraham Duquesne and a Spanish force supported by a Dutch maritime expedition force. Largely because the Dutch and Spanish ships were at bay making repairs from earlier a battle, the French fleet destroyed four Spanish and three Dutch ships with fireships. This battle secured the supremacy of the French fleet for the remainder of the war.

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    Last edited by Coog; 06-02-2012 at 07:05.

  17. #67

    Default

    On 2 June 1805 the British surrendered the fortification at Diamond Rock to the French.

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    The Battle of Diamond Rock took place between 31 May and 2 June 1805 during the Napoleonic Wars. It was an attempt by Franco-Spanish force despatched under Captain Julien Cosmao to retake Diamond Rock, at the entrance to the bay leading to Fort-de-France, from the British forces that had occupied it over a year before.

    The French in Martinique had been unable to oust the defenders from the strategically important rock, and the British garrison was able to control access to Fort de France bay, firing on ships attempting to enter it with guns they had placed on the cliffs. The arrival of a large combined Franco-Spanish fleet in May changed the strategic situation. The French commander, Pierre de Villeneuve had orders to attack British possessions in the Caribbean, but instead waited at Martinique for clearer instructions. He was finally persuaded to authorise an assault on the British position, and a Franco-Spanish flotilla was despatched to storm the rock. Already short of water, the defenders held on in the summit for several days, while the French, who had forgotten to bring scaling ladders, could make little headway.

    The British, short of both water and ammunition, eventually negotiated the surrender of the rock after several days under fire. The British commander was subsequently tried by court martial for loss of his 'ship' after repatriation, and honourably acquitted.

  18. #68
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    Default June 3rd

    1785 - Order received to sell last ship remaining in Continental Navy, frigate Alliance. No other Navy were ships authorized until 1794.

  19. #69
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    A pity Rudyard Kipling hadn't come along 100 years earlier; then this stupidity wouldn't have occurred. (One word: "Danegeld".)

  20. #70

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csadn View Post
    A pity Rudyard Kipling hadn't come along 100 years earlier; then this stupidity wouldn't have occurred. (One word: "Danegeld".)
    Danegeld, by Rudyard Kipling

    IT IS always a temptation to an armed and agile nation,
    To call upon a neighbour and to say:
    "We invaded you last night - we are quite prepared to fight,
    Unless you pay us cash to go away."

    And that is called asking for Dane-geld,
    And the people who ask it explain
    That you’ve only to pay ’em the Dane-geld
    And then you’ll get rid of the Dane!

    It is always a temptation to a rich and lazy nation,
    To puff and look important and to say:
    "Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you.
    We will therefore pay you cash to go away."

    And that is called paying the Dane-geld;
    But we’ve proved it again and again,
    That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld
    You never get rid of the Dane.

    It is wrong to put temptation in the path of any nation,
    For fear they should succumb and go astray,
    So when you are requested to pay up or be molested,
    You will find it better policy to say:

    "We never pay any one Dane-geld,
    No matter how trifling the cost,
    For the end of that game is oppression and shame,
    And the nation that plays it is lost!"

  21. #71

    Default On This Day 4 June

    On 4 June 1800 HMS Phoenix and HMS Port Mahon captured the French brig Albanaise. She was sailing from Toulon with provisions for Genoa when she encountered the Port Mahon, which initiated the chase about 35 miles west of Corsica. The chase lasted until early evening when Phoenix came up as Albanaise was just six miles out of Port Fino on Elba. Lieutenant Etiénne J. (or S.) P. Rolland fired two broadsides and then struck. (A subsequent court martial exonerated Rolland of the loss of his vessel.) HMS Haerlem shared in the capture, as did a number of other vessels in the squadron blockading Genoa.

    The British took her into service as HMS Albanaise and commissioned her under the command of Lieutenant Francis Newcombe.

  22. #72
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    Default

    Also:
    The Constitution got underway today to celebrate the Battle of Midway.
    https://www.facebook.com/home.php?re...4206740&type=1

  23. #73

    Default On This Day

    This thread is to tie all the daily event posts together in one post for each day. Each post will have links to the post(s) made by Anchorage members for that day. If you have a comment to make for a certain day, please use the original thread for that day. The goal is to arrange all the daily posts in consecutive order so that site members can easily reference them. If you find an event on a day where nothing was posted earlier, please make a separate thread and Eric or I will put a link to it in this thread.

    Also, here is a link to a thread that has scenario ideas taken from this thread:

    http://www.sailsofglory.org/showthre...-This-Day-quot
    Last edited by Coog; 06-15-2015 at 00:58.

  24. #74

    Default

    1 January

    The Action of 1 January 1800 was a naval battle of the Quasi-War that took place off the coast of present-day Haiti, near the island of Gonâve in the Bight of Léogâne.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?716-1-january
    Last edited by Coog; 01-11-2014 at 23:42.

  25. #75

    Default

    2 January

    USS Washington (1814)

    USS Independence (1814)

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?717-2-January


    On 2 January 1783, HMS Magicienne, met the Sibylle. The ships fought inconclusively, reducing each other to wrecks before parting.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...5735#post25735
    Last edited by Coog; 01-18-2014 at 19:27.

  26. #76

    Default

    3 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:04.

  27. #77

    Default

    4 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:04.

  28. #78

    Default

    5 January

    The first Continental Navy Squadron ordered to Sea

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?718-5-January
    Last edited by Coog; 01-11-2014 at 23:38.

  29. #79

    Default

    6 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:04.

  30. #80

    Default

    7 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:05.

  31. #81

    Default

    8 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:05.

  32. #82

    Default

    9 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:05.

  33. #83

    Default

    10 January

    -Reserved-
    Last edited by Coog; 01-07-2014 at 21:05.

  34. #84

    Default

    11 January

    -Reserved-

  35. #85

    Default

    12 January

    USS Chesapeake captured British Merchant Volunteer

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?723-January-12th


    The Action of 12–17 January 1640 was a naval battle between a Dutch fleet and a combined Spanish-Portuguese fleet during the Eighty Years' War.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-12-January

  36. #86

    Default

    13 January

    The Action of 13 January 1797 was a small naval battle fought between a French ship of the line and two British frigates off the coast of Brittany during the French Revolutionary Wars.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-13-January

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?292-January-13
    Last edited by Coog; 01-12-2014 at 18:53.

  37. #87

    Default

    14 January

    U.S. frigate Chesapeake captures British brig Hero.

    The capture of USS President was the result of a naval action fought at the end of the War of 1812. The frigate President tried to break out of New York Harbor, but was intercepted by a British squadron of four frigates and was forced to surrender after a battle with HMS Endymion.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?728-January-14th

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?293-January-14
    Last edited by Coog; 01-12-2014 at 18:57.

  38. #88

    Default

    15 January

    -Reserved-

  39. #89

    Default

    16 January

    The Battle of Cape St Vincent, took place off the southern coast of Portugal on 16 January 1780 during the American War of Independence

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-16-January

  40. #90

    Default

    17 January

    On 17 January 1813 the 32-gun frigate HMS Narcissus captured the brig USS Viper

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-17-January


    Battle of Cowpens 1781

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...tle-of-Cowpens
    Last edited by Coog; 01-18-2014 at 16:08.

  41. #91

    Default

    18 January

    -Reserved-

  42. #92

    Default

    19 January

    The Action of 19 January 1799 was a minor naval battle of the French Revolutionary Wars fought in waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, off Punta Europa.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-19-January

  43. #93

    Default

    20 January

    -Reserved-

  44. #94

    Default

    21 January

    -Reserved-

  45. #95

    Default

    22 January

    The Action of 22 January 1783 was a single ship action fought off the Chesapeake Bay during the American War of Independence.

    The Action of 22 January 1809 was a minor naval engagement fought off the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe during the Napoleonic Wars.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-22-January

  46. #96

    Default

    23 January

    -Reserved-

  47. #97

    Default

    24 January

    -Reserved-

  48. #98

    Default

    25 January

    The Action of 25 January 1797 was a minor naval battle of the French Revolutionary Wars, fought in the Gulf of Cádiz.

    http://sailsofglory.org/showthread.p...Day-25-January

  49. #99

    Default

    26 January

    -Reserved-

  50. #100

    Default

    27 January

    -Reserved-

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