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Thread: 2016 - March Après la Tempête by ShadowDragon

  1. #1

    Default 2016 - March Après la Tempête by ShadowDragon


    Après la Tempête

    My version of the 2016 Campaign scenario, Après la Tempête, by Bligh:

    https://sailsofglory.org/showthread....s-la-temp%EAte

    Scenario Set-Up

    A squadron of four French ships of the line have been damaged by a storm and are making for a safe harbour for repairs when they are intercepted by a Royal Navy squadron of three ships of the line. The four French ships each take 1-6 (roll a six-sided dice) ‘A’ / yellow damage chits, which was done as follows:

    Robuste: 5 chits including one with fire.
    Génèreux: 4 chits, including one with a leak.
    Roland: 2 chits, including one with fire.
    Éveillé: 3 chits – no critical hits.

    Fires are assumed to be put out, but with the ships each getting one hull box marked off with fire damage. The lead is assumed to be repaired and any water from flooding pumped out – so no extra damage from the ‘leak’ chit.

    The initial ship damage is shown with the ship logs below.

    The harbour has three forts. The main one is Fort Diable guarding the main entrance. On an island across from the Fort Diable is Fort Justice. A third fort, Fort L’Ange guards the inner harbour as well as a passage to the harbour suitable only for small vessels. These forts are shown below along with the initial positions of the two squadrons.

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    The French squadron – Robuste is the flag ship.

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    Captain Horatio Attenbridge, on board HMS Bahama, commanded the squadron of three ships of the line. They had been sent to intercept the French ships before they could reach safety. Horatio was proud of his small command. Kent Barham followed in HMS America; Barham was a solid, experienced sea captain. The last ship was HMS Argonaut commanded by Captain Hotspur Wellesley. Any misgivings Horatio had concerned Hotspur. There was no doubt he was gallant and fearless, but he could also be reckless. Those attributes could be a two-sided coin – good fortune on one side and bad on the other, which would it be this time.

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    Horatio eyed the French squadron. Not only did the British squadron have the weather gauge the French ships were sailing along a lee shore. They were beating to windward to reach the harbour, but Horatio’s ships would be on them before then and the French ships would have little space for manoeuvre.

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    Every captain in the Royal Navy knew of Nelson’s tactics at Trafalgar and dreamed of repeating the Lord’s success on that Great Day. Horation led his ships directly at the French squadron. The enemy ships would no choice but to tack across the wind and allow Horatio’s squadron the opportunity to cut the French squadron in pieces – à la Trafalgar, but first the French would have the honour of the first blow. Horatio had ordered the guns of his ships to be loaded with double shot – devastating but only good at short range.

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    HMS Bahama approached the French line. The lead ship, the Robuste, would have a raking shot on the Bahama. Horatio heard the bos’n mutter, “may we be thankful for what we are about to receive”. The French ship roared with a full broadside. The carnage on the Bahama was terrible. “Nothing critical”, thought Horatio as a splinter the size of a goodly spear whistled past him impaling a sailor near the thankful Bos’n.

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    Horatio ordered the Bahama to port – timing the manoeuvre to sail between the Robuste and the next French vessel, the Génèreux. They were at close range to the Génèreux with a raking bow shot. The Bahama’s crew were gratefully to return some of their blessings - the Génèreux was holed in several places below the waterline (extra rudder hits are treated as leaks). The Génèreux could only reply with her forward battery but it was enough to hole the Bahama.

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    Bahama had lost a goodly number of crewmen. As they ship came to close quarters with the Robuste and Génèreux, there were not enough crew to man all the battle stations and see to the leak. Horatio had to make a choice – finish off the Robuste or see to the leak. Perhaps a bit of Hotspur rubbed off on Horatio, so he gambled on the former (i.e., broadside, musketry, and boarding). The Bahama’s spit death and destruction - the stern rake of the Robuste took down all three of her masts, but the Bahama’s ordeal wasn’t completely over. The larboard, forward battery of Génèreux toppled the Bahama’s foremast. On board HMS America, Barham steered directly for the Robuste – perhaps to avoid becoming fouled with the Bahama or perhaps to board the Robuste or perhaps a bit of both. Whatever, Barham’s reasoning the America took a full boardside that raked the America. In turn, the America’s revenge was taken on the hapless Génèreux as America’s larboard broadside raked her. Leaking like a sieve, it was too much for the Génèreux and she struck her colours.

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    With the Génèreux out of action the musket fire was between the badly damaged Robuste and the two lead British ships.

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    The Bahama’s grapple failed but the America’s crew swarmed aboard. The Robuste asked for quarter and searched for a conscious officer to surrender the ship (the Robuste was down to her last crew box).

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    The Bahama broke free of the action to make repairs – she had a leak, a damaged mast and two turns of flooding to manage. The America would take some time to disengage from the Robuste. That left just Hotspur on the Argonaut to face the two remaining French ships. Fortune was with Hotspur. To avoid becoming entangled with the rapidly sinking Génèreux, the Roland had to steer to the Génèreux’s port side and straight into a raking broadside of the Argonaut. Like the Roland, Hotspur had little desire to become entangled in the wreckage of the lead two French ships and had steered the Argonaut to larboard, bringing her port batteries in firing arc of the Roland. The Argonaut was no less fierce than her sisters – the Roland suffered a fire, four leaks and a damaged mast. It was too much for the Roland and she too struck her colours.

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    Argonaut had no option but to veer to port to avoid the shoals on the lee shore. That brought her alongside the Éveillé, which had collided with the stricken Roland. Argonaut’s crew were rapidly reloading, but the Éveillé’s guns were ready and fire first. Again, fortune smiled on Hotspur and the Argonaut – the damage was relatively slight.

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    (This was a missed round of musket fire. The ship’s were place back, but the manoeuvre cards are for the next turn.)

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    The Éveillé’s captain had extricated his ship from the flotsam that once was the Roland but the Éveillé was now caught between the recovered Bahama and the Argonaut. (The Argonaut gets a stern rake with the line of fire just barely crossing the rear side of the Éveillé.)

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    The Éveillé gets off a long-range broadside at the Bahama, but takes a double-shotted, first broadside from the forward battery of the Argonaut – and suffers for it.

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    The Argonaut’s marines pour their fire onto the decks of the Éveillé, which has not enough crew to return fire.

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    The Éveillé heads back to pass between the remains of the French fleet and the lee shore while the Argonaut heads windward and the Bahama pursues. A long-range shot holes the Éveillé – with a flooding marker due next turn, the Éveillé stikes.

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    Horatio was astonished at what his ships had achieved. They had taken some serious damage, but the French fleet was destroyed. The Éveillé could be saved, but the Génèreux and Roland were lost. Robuste was dead in the water but could be towed. However, they would need fair seas if their two prizes could be brought to safety.

    Notes: I used Dobbs’ AI for all ships but I used Rob’s (Bligh’s) plan from his AAR for this scenario. A totally amazing fight but full credit goes to Rob's tactics and Dobbs' AI sheets.

    Ship Logs

    Royal Navy

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    French Navy

    Robuste - initial and final

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    Génèreux - initial and final

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    Roland - initial and final

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    Éveillé - initial and final

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    French Harbour Forts

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  2. #2
    Admiral of the Fleet.
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    Congratulations on your victory Captain Attenbridge. An action carried out in the true spirit of your namesake, and the Royal Navy. Your Captains and yourself will be mentioned in Dispatches, and I will personally commend you to the Prince Regent.

    Admiral Wm. Bligh. C in C Gibraltar.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Congratulations on your victory Captain Attenbridge. An action carried out in the true spirit of your namesake, and the Royal Navy. Your Captains and yourself will be mentioned in Dispatches, and I will personally commend you to the Prince Regent.

    Admiral Wm. Bligh. C in C Gibraltar.
    Thank you, Sir....and for the rep!

  4. #4
    Admiral of the Fleet.
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    My dear Attenbridge.
    Further to your own dispatches, I have now been informed by the Lords of the Admiralty that they are to be published in full in the Gazette, and that you have, heretofore, been awarded the temporary rank of Commodore of the squadron, backdated to your having taken up the command of the squadron.

    This to include the commensurate remuneration and shares in any forthcoming settlement regarding the disposal of your prizes taken, together with head money granted for the prisoners taken during the action.

    May I wish you joy in your windfall.

    Bligh.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    My dear Attenbridge.
    Further to your own dispatches, I have now been informed by the Lords of the Admiralty that they are to be published in full in the Gazette, and that you have, heretofore, been awarded the temporary rank of Commodore of the squadron, backdated to your having taken up the command of the squadron.

    This to include the commensurate remuneration and shares in any forthcoming settlement regarding the disposal of your prizes taken, together with head money granted for the prisoners taken during the action.

    May I wish you joy in your windfall.

    Bligh.
    Horatio is floored. Mind you it might have gone the other way if the tempest was kinder to the Robuste and the Robuste's captain had the prescience to double-shot his guns.

  6. #6
    Admiral of the Fleet.
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    On such details are battles won and lost. Even with the damage sustained the British were still outnumbered and out gunned.

    Fortune, and sea room favours the brave.

    Bligh.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    On such details are battles won and lost. Even with the damage sustained the British were still outnumbered and out gunned.

    Fortune, and sea room favours the brave.

    Bligh.
    True on all accounts.

    I have to say I was impressed with the power of a double-spotted, first broadside stern rake! Never had a ship completely de-masted with a single broadside before.

  8. #8
    Admiral of the Fleet.
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    It can be devastating, but beware the enemy who stands off and pounds you whilst you sit there double shotted and can't get into range. Let the circumstances of position wind and ability to close rule your decision.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  9. #9
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    Nicely played!

    One of Suzanne's favorite strategies is to come in to an engagement with the bearing side single shotted and the far side double shotted. The first time she caught me with that was unsettling.

    Nice to hear my AI is still steering ships on other folk's tables.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    Nicely played!

    One of Suzanne's favorite strategies is to come in to an engagement with the bearing side single shotted and the far side double shotted. The first time she caught me with that was unsettling.

    Nice to hear my AI is still steering ships on other folk's tables.
    Oooh! Suzanne has a clever mind there. That would have been a good strategy for the French ships in this scenario. It would be interesting to play the French side in this scenario (or both sides with real players). I won't do that as I want to get on with the campaign's next scenario. And thanks for the rep.

  11. #11
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    Well, we're not romping through these old campaigns, are we. I think you might be even slower than I am but only just. . It's good to comeback after almost a year and find you've just posted your next game, bravo.

    An enjoyable read, even if Johnny Rostbif appeared to win the day, that's what happens when the gallant Jean le Vagabond isn't in command of the main battery in le Génèreux, c'est la guerre as we French sea dogs are apt to say.
    I wonder how Baptiste and Hermione are and if there's still a few bottles of the 98 left in Martines bar. I must try and make time to visit.

    No time to be maudlin, just wanted to let you know it was a jolly good show you put on, even if the best man lost.

    Cheers and crack on with the next game, I've given you plenty of time to catch up.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    Well, we're not romping through these old campaigns, are we. I think you might be even slower than I am but only just. . It's good to comeback after almost a year and find you've just posted your next game, bravo.

    An enjoyable read, even if Johnny Rostbif appeared to win the day, that's what happens when the gallant Jean le Vagabond isn't in command of the main battery in le Génèreux, c'est la guerre as we French sea dogs are apt to say.
    I wonder how Baptiste and Hermione are and if there's still a few bottles of the 98 left in Martines bar. I must try and make time to visit.

    No time to be maudlin, just wanted to let you know it was a jolly good show you put on, even if the best man lost.

    Cheers and crack on with the next game, I've given you plenty of time to catch up.
    I am nothing if not indolent! So, no worries about catching up.

    I can take no credit for the victory. It was Rob's scenario using Rob's tactics. No connection between those two things? Sorry, Admiral! Too much whisk(e)y - can't remember which one. Ignore this whole paragraph. I wouldn't want to be expurgated from the Gazette.

  13. #13
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    I'm trundling along behind both of you gentlemen. Captain Winthrop Doylee has another adventure under his belt and is only waiting for me to write it up.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    I'm trundling along behind both of you gentlemen. Captain Winthrop Doylee has another adventure under his belt and is only waiting for me to write it up.
    "Trundling"??? That's not a sailing term with which I am familiar, Dobbs.

  15. #15
    Admiral of the Fleet.
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    You obviously have not witnessed the Superb's sailing qualities Paul, I should rather call that bumbling. Poor old Keats really must get her bottom scraped!

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    You obviously have not witnessed the Superb's sailing qualities Paul, I should rather call that bumbling. Poor old Keats really must get her bottom scraped!

    Rob.
    No, I have not, but I do know about sculling the tiller - at times useful but at others a waste of time and effort and even a no-no. "Er, not sculling, sir. Just looking for a breeze, sir."

  17. #17
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    I suspect strong liquor has been imbued, but I expect a good nights sleep has cured that.

  18. #18
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    Trundling - the manufacture of trunnels, the wooden pins that hold ships together! Or it could be complete BS.

    I just meant to say that you have more adventures under your belts than me and I am working to keep up.

  19. #19
    Admiral of the Fleet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    Trundling - the manufacture of trunnels, the wooden pins that hold ships together! Or it could be complete BS.

    I just meant to say that you have more adventures under your belts than me and I am working to keep up.
    Quite so Captain Dobbs.
    Bligh.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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