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Thread: Question about oars.

  1. #1
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Default Question about oars.

    For our real seagoing officers I have a question.
    Now that I am fielding Gunboats and Galleys and our first trial mission was executed yesterday a problem arose about what speed these vessles could attain when under oars rather than sails. We cobbled up a quick on the spot answer. This was if under oars the speed could be the highest backing sail speed on the card. If heading directly into the wind the lower speed. Does this seem a realistic speed to you gents and if not, any other suggestions would be acceptable as it was only an on the spot get out of that type answer so as not to slow the game. The same question then arises for Galleys. With more rowers and a sleeker line than gunboats should they be using fighting sailing speed for instance rather than the backing speeds? I have not factored in tidal effects as we assumed that as the Med had very little tidal movement we could ignore it for game purposes in this instance.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  2. #2
    1st Lieutenant
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    Dobbs

    Default

    Oars (or sweeps - big oars) are an interesting problem. First, what did they do with them while under sail? I ship mine and orient them fore and aft, but I only have two and they are only 8' (2m) long. I lift the oar over the gunwale. Perhaps on a galley the holes piercing the sides were large enough to fit the blades through and they could draw them into the boat? It seems that bringing them up the outside of the boat would be impractical. Were oars limited to the width of the galley and you just sat there with two shafts in your lap when under sail (not a big deal, you were a galley slave, I'm sure there were worse aspects)?

    Obviously they would have to be withdrawn under sail, because you don't want an oar blade catching a wave and cuisinarting your rowers and the side of the boat. This could also be hard on the oars and require a lot of replacements on hand.

    I like your solutions, Rob. The only additions I would make are that a row-able vessel would have to drop sail (anchor speed - one turn at a complete stop) before commencing to row, and the same thing in reverse.

    If a rowing vessel wants to pivot, it must come to a complete stop first. It can then pivot 90 degrees each turn.

    You also might choose to use a slower maneuver deck when rowing. Otherwise there wouldn't be any real advantage for sailing if there was a breeze blowing.

    What do you think?
    Last edited by Dobbs; 11-22-2020 at 09:08.

  3. #3
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    All I did for rowing was used the backing sails speed, and at its slowest speed when rowing into the wind. I know that they could get a fair lick on when rowing with what little wind there was. You will evidence their problem as I explain my first trial scenario more.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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