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Thread: USS Constitution's "Close Calls"

  1. #51
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    Yet another good logistical point DB.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Yet another good logistical point DB.
    Rob.
    Knowing the cheap stupid bastards at the Admiralty and counterpart institutions worldwide, it'd probably be "less men and less victuals and to hell with endurance and combat effectiveness."

    Remember, shipmates, if you DIE they don't have to PAY you...
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  3. #53

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    Here's some more on sloops of war --

    Here is an account of the fight between HMS Frolic and the USS Wasp:


    https://www.history.navy.mil/our-col...ms-frolic.html

    Here is an account of the participation of the Brig Argus and Sloop Hornet in the Battle of Derna (1805):
    https://www.history.navy.mil/content...documents.html

    Here is an account of the American privateer Polly escaping capture by the HMS Indian (1812):
    https://www.history.navy.mil/content...SN-903303.html
    Last edited by Wentworth; 10-03-2020 at 16:14.

  4. #54

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    Here are two chapters from Theodore Roosevelt's book "Naval War of 1812" which, in addition to discussing in detail some frigate operations as well as the Battle of New Orleans and the associated RN blockade, also talks about several sloop of war actions:

    http://www2.latech.edu/~bmagee/louis...le_of_n_o.html

  5. #55

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    Here are primary source accounts of the Battle of Tripoli Harbor (1805) including actions by Brigs and Sloops:

    https://www.history.navy.mil/researc...documents.html

    Here is some more info on sloops of war -- This is about the sloop of war USS Enterprise fight and capture of the corsair Tripoli in the Barbary Wars:

    https://www.history.navy.mil/content...-54386-KN.html

  6. #56
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wentworth View Post
    Here are two chapters from Theodore Roosevelt's book "Naval War of 1812" which, in addition to discussing in detail some frigate operations as well as the Battle of New Orleans and the associated RN blockade, also talks about several sloop of war actions:

    http://www2.latech.edu/~bmagee/louis...le_of_n_o.html
    Thanks again Bill.
    Cram bang full of incident, and lots of stats for a variety of ships.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  7. #57
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    Look what arrived in the post today Bill.

    Reading this will keep me out of mischief for a couple of weeks.
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    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  8. #58

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    I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did. Toll's writing style makes it hard to put down. I particularly liked how he opened the book with discussion of the global hegemony of the Royal Navy. I did not know the story of the American merchant ship ANN ALEXANDER coming upon the RN fleet a few hours after the Battle of Trafalgar concluded and selling its cargo of lumber to the RN to repair the battle damaged ships. Attention to detail like that is throughout the book and makes it so interesting. BTW -- I somehow managed to still get into mischief while reading this book -- call it my special talent, I guess...

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    "Do you go LOOKING for trouble?"
    "No, it usually seems to have a pretty good idea where I am."

    --Sgts. Cole and Riggs, Lethal Weapon 4
    --Diamondback
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  10. #60
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    That is akin to the " Cheer up things could get worse, so I cheered up and sure enough things got worse."
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  11. #61
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    I am sure that I will enjoy it Bill, and thanks to you my books on the American Mavy have now doubled.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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