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Thread: Mast Repair

  1. #1
    Able Seaman
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    Default Mast Repair

    Hi all,

    Any pointers on mast repair? Best glue, technique, etc? Was trying to remove a ship from a base that seems a little tighter than the others, and I guess I must have lodged some shot in the main and mizzen masts during the action because I popped them off! Thanks in advance.

    James

  2. #2
    2nd Lieutenant
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    James, I did this several years ago but maybe something here will help?

    http://volsminiatures.blogspot.com/2...-bash.html?m=1

  3. #3
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    This may also be of some interest Jim.

    https://sailsofglory.org/content.php?20-Wave-2-Mast-Repair

    or this one by Nightmoss which is my favourite for clarity.

    https://sailsofglory.org/content.php...-2-Mast-Repair

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  4. #4
    Able Seaman
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    Vol and Rob,

    Thanks, both are very helpful! I've dabbled.in wargaming on and off over the years, but this is the first I am really invested in and want to make sure I learn from those who received their commissions before me!

    James

  5. #5
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Remember Jim taht before you take any advice from me I am an old Admiral in his dotage. I am only astounded that I have not been yellowed years ago.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Remember Jim taht before you take any advice from me I am an old Admiral in his dotage. I am only astounded that I have not been yellowed years ago.

    Rob.
    I may be old now in your eyes
    But all my years have made me wise
    You don't see where the danger lies
    Oh call me back, call me back.

    But the war it ran its course, they could find no use for me
    And I live in the country now, grandchildren on my knee
    And sometimes think in all this world the saddest thing to be
    Old admirals who feel the wind, and never put to sea

    Now just like you I've sailed my dreams like ships across the sea
    And some of them they've come on rocks, and some faced mutiny
    And when they're sunken one by one I'll join that company
    Old admirals who feel the wind, and never put to sea


    Yellowed be damned, you're in command of the fleet.

  7. #7
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    What a superb Poem John, and thank you for your confidence in having me in charge of the Fleet.
    Just sometimes I make a fluff up on here that would not have ever happened five years ago. Most of it you chaps do not get to see it on the site.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  8. #8
    Midshipman
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    Hi Rob its a song by Al Stewart called suprisingly "Old Admirals" he first sets sail in 1853 in a wooden sailing ship, and it moves on through his life and to the steel ships of WW1.
    I've always liked these 2 lines.

    And sometimes think in all this world the saddest thing to be
    Old admirals who feel the wind, and never put to sea

    Take care

  9. #9
    1st Lieutenant
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    Hmmm, Jackie Fisher became a midshipman in 1854...

  10. #10
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post

    And sometimes think in all this world the saddest thing to be
    Old admirals who feel the wind, and never put to sea

    Take care
    Yes indeed John. Very poignant.
    I am astounded that I have never come across it before.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    Hmmm, Jackie Fisher became a midshipman in 1854...
    I haven't listened to the song in years, nor did I realise the connection to Fisher. It starts

    I can well recall the first time I ever put to sea
    It was on the old 'Calcutta' in 1853
    I was just a lad of fourteen years, a midshipman to be
    To make my way in sailing ships of the Royal Navy…

    I suspect it had to be 53 to rhyme with sea, 54 doesn't really do it.

    Wikipedia has him entering service at 13 but also states "The entry examination consisted of writing out the Lord's Prayer and jumping naked over a chair.[31]" that may be true but sometimes I wonder at the facts in Wikipedia.

    Sorry James - I'm completely off topic here and I should be working on jungle today, rather than enjoying myself on the internet.

  12. #12
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    You should put it in our favourite songs of the sea thread John.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    Sorry James - I'm completely off topic here and I should be working on jungle today, rather than enjoying myself on the internet.
    Nothing to be sorry about! Always something new to learn!

  14. #14
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Found it now.
    Thanks Rob.

    Old Admirals

    Al Stewart


    I can well recall the first time I ever put to sea
    It was on the old "Calcutta" in eighteen fifty-three
    I was just a lad of fourteen years, a midshipman to be
    To make my way in sailing ships of the Royal Navy

    By the time that I was twenty-one I'd sailed the world around
    Weathered storms in the China seas with the hatches battened down
    And made my way by starlight off the coast of Newfoundland
    And dined on beer and herrings while the waves blew all around

    I live in retirement now and through my window comes the sound
    Of seagulls and sets my mind remembering
    The evening stars like memories sail far beyond the distant trees
    Way out across the open seas I hear them sing

    Oh, the wooden ships they turned to iron and the iron ships to steel
    And shed their sails like autumn leaves with the turning of the wheel
    And I was given Captain's rank, and soon took under me
    The proudest ship that ever sailed for Queen and country

    Ah, the old queen she passed away with the newborn century
    And I received my calling up to the admiralty
    The sands ran through the hourglass each day more rapidly
    As we watched the growing of the fleets of High Germany

    So at last the Great War blazed I waited with the passing days
    A call to arms that never came, writing letters
    "I may be old now in your eyes, but all my years have made me wise
    You don't see where the danger lies, oh call me back, call me back..."

    But the war, it ran its course they could find no use for me
    And I live in the country now, grandchildren on my knee
    And sometimes think in all this world the saddest thing to be
    Old admirals who feel the wind and never put to sea

    Now just like you, I've sailed my dreams like ships across the sea
    And some of them they've come on rocks and some faced mutiny
    And when they're sunken one by one I'll join that company -
    Old admirals who feel the wind, and never put to sea
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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