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Thread: Looking for a simple Chase Campaign System

  1. #1
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    Default Looking for a simple Chase Campaign System

    Hi - as the title suggests I'm trying to put together a small and simple campaign set in the Mediterranean that I can run with two willing/pressed men over the internet.

    I envisage some kind of commerce raiding using a chart of the Med, a small number of ships, maybe even just one per commander, I'm looking for a simple movement system to get the ships from a to b, some way of deciding if and when they meet other ships and what ships they are. Based on that they will either chase or run away. I have some chase rules that Dobbs wrote to cover that aspect and then if they catch or are caught I will fight the game solo and advise the 2 players of the result.

    I have looked here and on the internet but without sucess, althougn that could just be my weak google fu.

    Does anyone know of any rules that might cover the commerce raiding side of the campaign, I don't want anything too complex as I have a lot on at the moment and I'm afraid it would have to be free. Any thoughts?

    Cheers and thanks in advance for any ideas.

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    Give me some time and I will share some bits and baubs with you that might be along your line of thinking

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    Lookout Cards.pdf

    Here are some cards that I made up with the idea of making a stack equal to the length of a voyage plus a one or two extra blanks per week. Before assembling the stack the person overseeing it decides how many potential encounters there might be and what type they might be. Then that number of "Sail Ho!" cards are put in the deck.

    The cards are randomly shuffled then one drawn for each day that passes. My intention was to capture the feeling of days of the empty sea followed by the frantic action of an encounter. Upon an encounter, the overseeing player randomly selects one of the listed ship encounters. To further increase the storytelling aspect, this is where my Chase Rules would come in, or you could move directly to the regular playing mat.

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    Like it Dobbs !

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Thanks Dobbs, that's an elegant way of determining sightings, I could maybe do it in real time, to give the right feel for it.

    You refer to a list of encounters, do you have one drawn up already? I know I could work one out fairly easily I'm just being lazy, that and putting all my spare mental energy into making some cliff scenery and I don't seem to have much mental energy at all.

    Thanks for the cards, they are much appreciated.

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    Weather Cards 1.pdf

    Weather Cards 2.pdf

    Weather Cards 3.pdf

    Weather Cards 4.pdf

    Weather Cards 5.pdf

    Here are some cards I made up to go with the Lookout Cards. When voyaging, each day starts with drawing a Weather Card and a Lookout Card.

    Encounter, DM Checklist.pdf

    Here's my Checklist for Encounters. Just insert the ships and information that you'd like as encounters for a potential voyage, and off you go (of course, the list is kept secret from the player on the voyage). You can either plan the encounters, building to a dramatic conclusion, or if you favor increased randomness, roll to see which ship or squadron is encountered each time a Sail Ho! card is drawn. Beware if going for drama, even you don't know if all of your potential encounters will happen if playing with more Lookout Cards than the voyage is long...unless you rig the deck!
    Last edited by Dobbs; 04-07-2020 at 13:03.

  7. #7
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    Very innovative as usual Dobbs.
    I like the cut of your jib sir.

    Bligh.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Thanks for this Dobbs, the weather cards will come in useful. I had wondered if I was to do this in real time, I could look up the weather forecast in the sea area it was happening on a daily basis. I could capture the Grib files and send them to the Captains and judge the weather effect from that. April should give some variable weather.

    Fot the encounters I was thinking things like, fishing boats, they might impart information or provide misleading info. Small, Medium or large Merchant ships, they might be armed, neutral, enemy, escorted or decoys, and provide prize money or maybe if neutral and you capture/harm them, you face a court martial. Obviously there's the Frech man of war trying to capture or sink you, but maybe a friendly man of war that is flying a French flag as a ruse and maybe you believe it is French and attack it.

    I don't have the experience or knowledge to provide a good match between the British and French man of war. I would aim to have the French (defending ship) slightly stronger than the British (commerce raider) The idea being that the British ship will attack all enemy shipping but will need to run away from the French man of war, so there's always a risk when you sight a ship, is it a prize or will it kill you.

    Not really got my head arround this yet, but thanks for the impetus.
    Cheers

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    It sounds like you're heading in the right direction, John. My aim was to make a voyage feel like a D&D adventure, with the encountered ships being like wandering monsters.

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    I do like the way this is going Dobbs, and Vagabond has brought up some very interesting possibilities here.
    Just a couple of points regarding British ships:-
    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post

    Maybe if neutral and you capture/harm them, you face a court martial.
    If a British Captain, you would have to pay compensation to the owners for losses inccurred, and this would include business lost to trading whilst the ship was impounded. This could bancrupt a Captain so Neutral looking ships were treated very cautiously, until the ships manifest had been checked. Contrabanders were then legitimate prizes. Deserters could of course also be removed from the said ships regardless of nationality, which obviously caused friction between us and the United States especially, when we impressed "British?" citizens from their ships.



    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    Obviously there's the Frech man of war trying to capture or sink you, but maybe a friendly man of war that is flying a French flag as a ruse and maybe you believe it is French and attack it.
    Again as far as men of war were concerned they would make their private number and the daily code to any other ship to identify if it were friendly or nay. this was to avoid any incidents of friendly fire of this nature. Of course accidents could still happen. Ships sailing for long periods in foreign parts may not be in possession of up to date codes, or not be aware of the state of war or peace between nations. This in itself could lead to an interesting game scenario which I intend to explore in one of my Solo games which I write this year.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    It sounds like you're heading in the right direction, John. My aim was to make a voyage feel like a D&D adventure, with the encountered ships being like wandering monsters.
    I think that's how I envisage it as well, but the more I think about it the more I add complexity which is not what I'm after :(

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    Rob thanks for that information on neutrals, very thought provoking.

    My difficulty is that I'm coming from a very low knowledge base when it comes to naval ships and history of this time and I'm easily distracted. This morning I've been trying to find out how high the lookout would be so that I can work out how far his horizon would be and ended up on the Flat Earth Society site reading some convoluted rubbish about density of air at a low level is the reason you can't see as far from the ground as you can from a crows nest

    Do you know where the lookout was located, was it at the top of the mast or the top of the topmast or even higher? Would there just be one lookout in 1 mast and which one, or would there be one in each mast?

    I'm just going to measure the model to find the height.

    Anyway it's back to cliff building today.
    Cheers

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    Apparently the lookout on a Frigate could spot another's topmast at about 12 miles in clear weather, and a larger vessels such as a First Rate at about 14. That dependent to a certain extent on the angle of the viewed ship to the viewer, and the amount of swell. I interpolate from this that a First Rate lookout could spot another First Rate at a little over 14 miles, as both ships had higher masts. Obviously the lookout on a Sloop would be able to see a shorter distance.

    Depending on circumstances, and the paranoia of the Deck Officer, would determine the number of lookouts in action at any time. It would seem usual to have two up. One at the Fore, and one at the Main.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Here's the official way captains do it these days:

    Beware puzzling out the top table. I just realized that there's a tabbing error on the Feet/nm line. Just use your imagination to tab Feetnm into Feet nm so the columns underneath line up.

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    Last edited by Dobbs; 04-08-2020 at 09:42.

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    Guess that answers the question then Dobbs.
    Thanks.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    My Chase Rules:

    My main objective is to provide a template for a developing engagement or a way to escape one. There is no maneuvering since it is a linear chase. This is meant to play quickly and not be a stand alone game. Sequence of play is firing and then movement. A ship escapes if it gets beyond hull down.

    A Demonstration:

    1798 August – At Sea – east of Brazil – weather, fair

    Last month, the Quasi War with France erupted. The 32 gun frigate Saratoga has been brought out of retirement to defend the interests of Baltimore’s merchants once again. Today, as the predawn lights the east at the start of the morning watch, the lookout calls, “Sail Ho!”

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    The lookout’s sharp eyes have spied two vessels, both ship-rigged, hull down on the horizon. One is of Burden 1, and the other is a Burden of 4. Even at this range, it is obvious that the smaller ship’s crew handles her better that her companion’s crew does theirs. Saratoga’s captain decides the lookout’s discovery warrants further investigation.

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    The range closes swiiftly, but even though they are now hull up, 5- 8 nautical miles away, nothing more is known about the strangers.

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    At long tactical range, or about a mile, it’s still not clear who they are, until tricolors blossom at their taffrails and they both turn to flee. As Saratoga’s flag is run up, the stern guns of both Frenchmen speak. Saratoga replies in kind. Over the course of the next half watch, the gunnery of the French is a little more effective, and Saratoga gets her nose bloodied.

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    By the beginning of the second half of the morning watch it is obvious that Saratoga is faster than the larger French ship. The range decreases to extreme short tactical. The smaller Frenchman is obviously holding back to maintain an escort. The running gun battle continues, making a lot of noise, but little damage. Saratoga focuses on trying disable her smaller opponent.

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    In the first half of the forenoon watch, Saratoga scores some lucky hits. The sloop staggers, but its speed is unimpaired.

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    In the second half of the forenoon watch, Saratoga takes a sail hit, but it isn’t enough to discourage her from the chase.

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    The first half of the afternoon watch passes with no real developments; a futile cannonade and the French hold their position.

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    Saratoga catches the sloop betwixt the wind and the waves.

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    During the first dog watch, Saratoga hits the sloop hard again, and using her superior speed throws a broadside as well. The French sloop captain realizes that there is really only one way out of this. The stern guns fire and the sloop and Indiaman turn to fight…

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    Last edited by Dobbs; 04-08-2020 at 20:03.

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    Dobbs you can't leave it here, did the Saratoga take the French ships or not.

    Thanks to you and Rob for the information on sighting distances. What I couldn't find out was where the lookouts were stationed. I know that the fore top and main top are located at the top of their respective masts but the next mast up also has a top and I wondered if the lookout would be in this one as it gives greater visability.

    Using your table and Robs information it would seem that sightings of 12nm for a frigate to frigate, the lookout would be roughly 50' above sea level, ie half the 100' on the table.

    Cheers to both of you.

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    Well, it has yet to be sorted out, so it's a bit of a cliffhanger. Rest assured, Saratoga will face the Frenchmen and the exciting conclusion will be posted here.

    There's kind of a hiccup in the timeline, so also in the works and 20 years before, is Saratoga leaving Newport, this time with a half moon and less of a tide running. Suzanne says Lexington will not be attempting a breakout until the tide is much more reasonable. More adventures await as two Yankee frigates cruise the high seas (if they get out of the Providence River).

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    It is all very exciting and a thousand questions spring to mind Dobbs.
    I will, therefore, confine mine to one. This is the construction of your wonderful equipment.
    How did you perfect the lipped board and what is the indicator dial made from. It seems to be intigral with the backboard from the photo.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    atoga[/I] Suzanne says Lexington will not be attempting a breakout until the tide is much more reasonable. More adventures await as two Yankee frigates cruise the high seas (if they get out of the Providence River).
    Suzanne is my kind of Captain, the only spanner in the works is that the blockading force will be expecting you to go after slack water, with the ebb in your favour as that's the sensible thing to do.

    Good luck with this.

    Bye the way you made a very neat job of your board, I was just going to use a bit of paper and some tiddly winks to mark the relative positions. I'm almost ashamed to mention it now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post

    Bye the way you made a very neat job of your board, I was just going to use a bit of paper and some tiddly winks to mark the relative positions. I'm almost ashamed to mention it now.
    That's why I asked John. With all this time on my hands I was thinking of trying to emulate Dobb's superb board, with bells on.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    The pointer on the Watch Table is a Wind Gauge pointer from my spare damage chit collection. The Watch Table was printed on cardstock on an inkjet printer. I then covered it with a self-adhesive laminating sheet (picture a sheet of clear tape). After that I applied a backing of an adhesive foam sheet from a craft store (Walmart). Lastly, I used a 1/4" punch to knock out a hole for the pointer (actually I did this in two steps, after laminating the paper, and then again after applying the foam).

    I used to buy packs of cheap legal tablets and rip the cardboard off the back, then use a spray adhesive to make chits and tables, but the foam is easy and colorful. It also saves a lot of paper. If anyone could use a cardboard-less legal pad, see me.
    Last edited by Dobbs; 04-10-2020 at 05:59.

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    The playing mat is a piece of vinyl that is the length of the width of a roll. That's why I fudged on the Hull Up and Hull Down ranges and split them with a dotted line, the board would have had to be nine inches longer and I didn't want to have to buy two yards of vinyl.

    The markings are done with an orange waterproof Sharpy pen. I used a metal ruler with a cork backing to avoid the inevitable weeping of the marker under a ruler laying flat on vinyl.

    Here's a plan of the Playing Mat:

    Chase Board.pdf
    Last edited by Dobbs; 04-10-2020 at 08:14.

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    Thanks for the explaination Dobbs. I just happen to have a spare Wind Gauge thanks to Raffer J Larwood, and we used to laminate our excercise books with the sticky backed plastic, so the rest is just a formality as they say.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Thanks for the explaination Dobbs. I just happen to have a spare Wind Gauge thanks to Raffer J Larwood, and we used to laminate our excercise books with the sticky backed plastic, so the rest is just a formality as they say.

    Rob.
    I suppose this means I cant use my bit of paper and tiddly winks.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    I suppose this means I cant use my bit of paper and tiddly winks.

    Of course you can! They just don't photograph well for us living vicariously through your adventures.

    My prototype was a bit of paper and probably smaller bits of paper for the ships. I didn't have the luxury of tiddly winks.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    I suppose this means I cant use my bit of paper and tiddly winks.

    Yea! No worries about what you use John. It will probably be about a year before I get around to it anyway.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Well back to the purpose of my original post and thanks to Dobbs and Admiral Rob for their thoughts on this so far. Unfortunately no one has done all the work already and so I have spent a little time trying to distil my ideas for the essential things to take into account and I would like to catalogue them here, please feel free to comment on the inanity of them, but substitute something concrete in their place. If there's anything I've not covered please shout out but I am trying to keep it simple.

    The essence of the game will be that Captain Jack Snapcase operating out of the British base of Mahon in Menorca has been given a 30 day cruise between the area of Barcelona and Gibraltar, his orders are to disrupt enemy shipping, either capturing or sinking enemy merchantmen. Le Compte d’Emfour will be commanding a French Frigate or something larger and will be charged with defending the same area, maybe with 1, 2 or 3 ships under his command. Suggestions welcome for the number and reasons. I'm not after a straight fight, basically if the French find the British ship I want it to run away if it can but if caught and has to fight I want it to have some chance of success.

    This will happen in real time i.e. 1 day equals 1 day, I shall look at the weather forecast for the current day and this will be the weather in the campaign for that day, giving the wind speed and direction for the area that the ships are.

    The things I need to determine are

    Cruising sailing speed - Relative to the Wind Speed and Direction and Relative to the Type and Size of the Vessel.

    Encounter Table - things like - Fishing vessels, small, medium and large Merchant Ships, Men of War – French or British (I don’t have any Spanish ships) Pirate/Privateer, Moorish Galley (unlikely as I don’t have any) Anything else? Did they use convoys in the Med? I shall use Dobbs Sail Ho cards to determine if a ship is sighted, I will doctor the deck depending on the likelyhood of meeting another ship.

    Line of sight – Distance to actually see - Mast to mast, mast to hull.
    - Distance to recognize – Ship size, Nationality of ship build, Are they flying a flag as a Ruse de Guerre and if so what distance is this determined. Taking into account Robs thoughts on making your number and getting the correct response. However I know there were a number of Court Martial’s for Captains who fired on friendly ships because they thought they might not be friendly. The interesting thing was that very often they were acquitted because a proper sailor could interpret a ships intentions by the way it was sailed and how it was manoeuvring so if the other Captain was unsure of your ship he would be looking to fire the first broadside which would be considered aggressive.

    Gradual Reduction of crew - due to sending off Prize crews, should I take 1 crew chit or maybe ½ a crew chit to sail each prize?

    Land Actions – I have in mind to make the English ship set off low on water and need to re-water after maybe 20 days, this will entail landing in an isolated cove with a stream. The cove will be semi fortified, probably a small tower with a single gun (1 damage counter) and very small garrison (1crew chit?)
    - Some of the merchant ships will run away and seek shelter under the guns of any fortification's and I envisage the English player landing a force to cut out or burn these ships. I need to read up on land action rules.

    Chase Rules - Once an encounter has happened at sea I shall use Dobbs chase rules to determine if the chase ship catches the chased ship. There will come a point when the chase discovers what they are chasing and may decide they made a mistake and run away and the roles will be reversed.

    Victory Conditions – Value of Prizes minus mistakes (capture of neutrals etc) minus damage or sinking to the British ship. (To be valued)

    OK they are my limited thought, please bare in mind I want to keep it simple and of a limited time period, my plan is the 30 day cruise and at the end of a month the British Captain has to be back in Mahon, if he can. So is there anything I’ve missed and should include, if you can hang any flesh on the bare bones of my thoughts I should be very grateful.

    My next stage is to detail specific rules to cover this unless someone comes up with an existing rule set in the mean time.

    Thanks for any input you may have.

    Cheers
    Last edited by Vagabond; 04-11-2020 at 05:49.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    The essence of the game will be that Captain Jack Snapcase operating out of the British base of Mahon in Menorca has been given a 30 day cruise between the area of Barcelona and Gibraltar, his orders are to disrupt enemy shipping, either capturing or sinking enemy merchantmen. Le Compte d’Emfour will be commanding a French Frigate or something larger and will be charged with defending the same area, maybe with 1, 2 or 3 ships under his command. Suggestions welcome for the number and reasons. I'm not after a straight fight, basically if the French find the British ship I want it to run away if it can but if caught and has to fight I want it to have some chance of success.

    I am working on a system of devising how many ships you are up against for my Solo Missions this year. My idea was dice base but could also have an effect on your getting support from your own side as well. Maybe not appropriate if your Captain Snapchase is working alone, but you can have a look see what I'm doing when I post later this week.

    This will happen in real time i.e. 1 day equals 1 day, I shall look at the weather forecast for the current day and this will be the weather in the campaign for that day, giving the wind speed and direction for the area that the ships are.

    The things I need to determine are

    Cruising sailing speed - Relative to the Wind Speed and Direction and Relative to the Type and Size of the Vessel.

    Probably something for Dobbs or Texas to answer.

    Encounter Table - things like - Fishing vessels, small, medium and large Merchant Ships, Men of War – French or British (I don’t have any Spanish ships) Pirate/Privateer, Moorish Galley (unlikely as I don’t have any) Anything else? Did they use convoys in the Med? I shall use Dobbs Sail Ho cards to determine if a ship is sighted, I will doctor the deck depending on the likelyhood of meeting another ship.

    The British certainly did, but the size and strength of the escort was a very movable feast.

    Line of sight – Distance to actually see - Mast to mast, mast to hull.
    - Distance to recognize – Ship size, Nationality of ship build, Are they flying a flag as a Ruse de Guerre and if so what distance is this determined.

    Moot point. Some were practically muzzle to muzzle before they raised their true colours, but were I a British Captain I would have a few up my own sleeve if they were that close and maybe cut their bow or stern as they came up depending on weather gauge and the approach angle. Always a good ploy to suddenly do the unexpected if you suspect a trap. It can fluster an opponent, and you may even avoid a double shotted side and just exchange your ready prepared double shotted side for their single shotted one. From my reading it seemed as if most signals Officers, if they had a good Dolland Glass, and the wind was in a suitable direction. ie. not streaming the signal away from the reader, would be readable as soon as the ships were hull up.

    Taking into account Robs thoughts on making your number and getting the correct response. However I know there were a number of Court Martial’s for Captains who fired on friendly ships because they thought they might not be friendly. The interesting thing was that very often they were acquitted because a proper sailor could interpret a ships intentions by the way it was sailed and how it was manoeuvring so if the other Captain was unsure of your ship he would be looking to fire the first broadside which would be considered aggressive.

    Some sailors could judge a national ship by the rake angle of its masts and the set of its sails. Also the way that they were pieced together from the bolt of cloth. the French seemed to have a distinctly different method to ours. Of course the ship you are viewing could be a prize! Tough one that Cap'n.

    Gradual Reduction of crew - due to sending off Prize crews, should I take 1 crew chit or maybe ½ a crew chit to sail each prize?

    Depends on prize. Privateer large crews, need one chit hands, and one Marines to quell them and prevent them retaking the ship later if you are sending it home. If accompanying your warship maybe fewer men needed, unless you anticipate a storm! You may be separated. My rule of thumb is small ships one chit for ease of reckoning on your part. I always count one boat model = I chit of men. In a larger action there was often no time to secure prizes until after the battle. A lot then depended on the honour of the surrendering Officer. As we know from History some were more honourable than others.

    Land Actions – I have in mind to make the English ship set off low on water and need to re-water after maybe 20 days, this will entail landing in an isolated cove with a stream. The cove will be semi fortified, probably a small tower with a single gun (1 damage counter) and very small garrison (1crew chit?)
    - Some of the merchant ships will run away and seek shelter under the guns of any fortification's and I envisage the English player landing a force to cut out or burn these ships. I need to read up on land action rules.

    One interesting action coming up this week. Captain Kiwi's cutting out escapade. A night action with consequence cards, and moored ship state of readiness chits. For instance are most of the crew in the local Bordello or drunk in their hammocks. How good is the anchor watch? etc. Night actions give you plenty of scope to get up close and personal before losing too many of you men. if the enemy are alert, just treat as a normal boarding action, but with you getting that first chit advantage if they are surprised.

    Chase Rules - Once an encounter has happened at sea I shall use Dobbs chase rules to determine if the chase ship catches the chased ship. There will come a point when the chase discovers what they are chasing and may decide they made a mistake and run away and the roles will be reversed.

    Victory Conditions – Value of Prizes minus mistakes (capture of neutrals etc) minus damage or sinking to the British ship. (To be valued)

    Neil did a very comprehensive set of rules for this in our Solo campaign some years ago. Have a look at it.

    OK they are my limited thought, please bare in mind I want to keep it simple and of a limited time period, my plan is the 30 day cruise and at the end of a month the British Captain has to be back in Mahon, if he can. So is there anything I’ve missed and should include, if you can hang any flesh on the bare bones of my thoughts I should be very grateful.

    My next stage is to detail specific rules to cover this unless someone comes up with an existing rule set in the mean time.

    Thanks for any input you may have.

    Cheers
    Hope that gives you food for further thought John. To be frank I only scratched the surface of many of your questions. You could write a whole article on most of them, and certainly a book on signalling alone. I know because I have read it and it is not all about Popham. either.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Hope that gives you food for further thought John. To be frank I only scratched the surface of many of your questions. You could write a whole article on most of them, and certainly a book on signalling alone. I know because I have read it and it is not all about Popham. either.

    Rob.
    Thanks a lot Rob for your thoughts on this, I very much appreciate it. I'll look forward to Captain Kiwi's cutting out expedition, will you post the scenario and then the game?

    I've barely looked at the solo campaign games but I know there's lots of good ideas in there, I've seen some of the stuff Neil has done and been very impressed with it so I'll certainly search out his solo rules for prizes. I'm keen to try and get this underway with the minimum of fuss and effort, I can change things as I go along if I'm not happy with it, but if I hang about too long something else will take my fancy and Ill never get it off the ground.
    Cheers

  31. #31
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    My pleasure John. I just hope that I did not raise more questions than answers. Once you refine all the variables to something workable, and discard the superfluousbits that you don't require it shold all be a lot mor simple. That is the main reason that I use a card system for my chance encounters. Your prior thinking is all on cards and you can forget them and dice just drawing a card when you need a decision. You can of course also add taylored cards for special actions fitted to that particular scenario similar to the ones which I did for "The Basque Roads" game at Doncaster last year.

    The origin of the chance cards was first mooted by Captain Kiwi about 30 years ago for an AWI game we put on at
    Sheffield, which involved a lot of random events.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    October Mission Solo Scenario. Letters of Mark.


    This is the Scenario for the Good Captain's game which he played at my house and asked me to post for him as he has problems getting pictures to post from his computer John.


    "Cutting it fine."


    Word had arrived by a fast packet boat that the enemy were about to launch an attack on one of the islands held by you. In order to recruit mercenary troops to bolster the Regular invading forces an enemy Sloop containing a substantial amount of gold bullion escorted by an enemy agent is to be dispatched at the dark of the moon. It will be escorted by a frigate.
    As your ship is the only one in harbour large enough to take on a frigate you are instructed to sail immediately and cut out the enemy ship before it can sail and disappear into the blue.
    Your ship should aim to arrive off the enemy coast two nights before the sailing is scheduled whilst the tide is on the flow to aid you in entering the enemy harbour.




    Wind steady for the whole mission.



    For the boarding party you have earmarked the Marines and two units of the crew. You may use any or all but one must be sailors. your ship will lose the corresponding boxes temporarily one for each unit card. If any card is deleted during the action, one box is lost from your ship crew for each mat closed.









    Small ships boats may move one chain shot marker on the rule per turn. It takes one move to lower a boat and one move to enter or exit.



    The enemy port is well guarded by two substantial Forts at sea level, and a boom across the entrance of the harbour.










    You must try to escape detection by the forts and the harbour guard patrol boat when you force the boom.

    If the enemy are alerted you will be fired upon after two more moves and the ships crews will return to their ships three moves after the first gun.


    The enemy are positioned as in the photograph.

    Silence is all. To establish if you are smoked, draw a card from the pack at each of the key moments. If you are successful return the card and shuffle the pack ready for the next draw.

    Cards are to be drawn at the following points.

    A. as soon as you are between the forts.

    B. On forcing the boom.

    C. coming alongside the two ships.

    You will at this stage also need to draw from the bag to see if an anchor watch is on either ship.
    if you draw a man chit then you will have to board against one chit as in a normal boarding action.

    D.Still undetected! set your lowest speed sail and draw a card as you move off.

    E finally draw a card as you pass the forts again.
    The forts will not have first fire bonus as they are unready.
    your ship will have first time and double shot if loaded. The prize may only fire each side once only with the single shot loaded by the enemy crew, and as your men are busy sailing the ship you will not be able to reload.

    If alerted the enemy Frigate will get underway two moves after the alert and may challenge you at any time thereafter.




    Card backs



    Card Pack should contain four Success,




    and two Disaster strikes cards.


    Escape with the ship and you have won the game, the prize in money, and the ability "Boarding Captain."

    Good luck!

    Bligh.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    That's going to be a tense game, I like the way it's been thought through and it would make a great solo game because of the uncertainly built into it.

    Presumably the cutting out ship is a frigate? And is somewhere outside the harbour, out of canon range of the fortifications?

    Is the intention to capture the sloop and leave the enemy frigate behind? If so will it give chase once the crew are back on board?

    Looking forward to seeing how this pans out, and your scenery looks as lovely as always.

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    You can see Wentworth's take on it here in post 30 John.

    https://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?4987-AARs-2018



    Hopefully also Captain Kiwi's later today.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    You can see Wentworth's take on it here in post 30 John.

    https://sailsofglory.org/showthread.php?4987-AARs-2018



    Hopefully also Captain Kiwi's later today.

    Rob.
    Cheers Rob, I've just read it and as I thought - it was a tense game.
    Excellent.

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