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Thread: The Forgotten Fleet - US Navy Fighting Sail 1815-1860

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    Default The Forgotten Fleet - US Navy Fighting Sail 1815-1860

    An interesting video that certainly puts the US Navy into perspective on the world scene. I learned more than a few things here. Was originally posted on Facebook, but I've seen several of this YouTuber's videos previously.

    "It's not the towering sails, but the unseen wind that moves a ship."
    –English Proverb

  2. #2
    2nd Lieutenant
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    The thing is, comparing sailing ships from 1815-1860 to our ships is like comparing Jackie Fisher's battlecruisers to pre-dreadnoughts.

    Post-Napoleonic ships had rounded sterns to better withstand rakes. The elaborate beakheads disappeared, replaced with a more practical foredeck, but not nearly as stylish. They had diagonal bracing so they could be longer without the extra decks. Their broadsides were guns that could fire exploding shells. Against these shells, the wooden walls would turn out to be paper thin. Steam tugs were soon available for coming and going from harbor if need be.
    Last edited by Dobbs; 01-22-2020 at 20:25.

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    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Thank you for bringing this to the attention of the chaps. Jim.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    The thing is, comparing sailing ships from 1815-1860 to our ships is like comparing Jackie Fisher's battlecruisers to pre-dreadnoughts.

    Post-Napoleonic ships had rounded sterns to better withstand rakes. The elaborate beakheads disappeared, replaced with a more practical foredeck, but not nearly as stylish. They had diagonal bracing so they could be longer without the extra decks. Their broadsides were guns that could fire exploding shells. Against these shells, the wooden walls would turn out to be paper thin. Steam tugs were soon available for coming and going from harbor if need be.
    A very moot point Dobbs.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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