Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Third Rate ships of 74 guns.

  1. #1
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default Third Rate ships of 74 guns.

    HMS Albion (1763)

    Name:  HMS_Albion_in_a_Gale.jpg
Views: 23
Size:  12.3 KB
    By John 'Vallack' Tom.

    HMS Albion was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line designed by Thomas Slade. M/ shipwright Adam Hayes. She was launched on 16 May 1763 at Deptford, being adapted from a design of the old 90-gun ship Neptune which had been built in 1730, and was the first ship to bear the name. She was the first of a series of ships built to the same lines, which became known as the Albion-class ship of the line. Following the prototype, two sister ships were ordered in the post war period, and another pair with modifications to the original design during the 1777/78 period.



    History
    Great Britain
    Name:
    HMS Albion
    Ordered:
    1 December 1759
    Builder:
    Deptford Dockyard
    Launched:
    16 May 1763
    Honours and
    awards:
    Fate:
    Wrecked, April 1797
    General characteristics
    Class and type:
    Albion-classship of the line
    Tons burthen:
    1662 (bm)
    Length:
    168 ft (51 m) (gundeck)
    Depth of hold:
    18 ft 10 in (5.74 m)
    Propulsion:
    Sails
    Sail plan:
    Full rigged ship
    Armament:
    • Gundeck: 28 × 32-pounder guns
    • Upper gundeck: 28 × 18-pounder guns
    • QD: 14 × 9-pounder guns
    • Fc: 4 × 9-pounder guns

    She was commissioned in the May of 1770 for the Falkland Islands dispute, she then became a guardship at Portsmouth.

    In 1778 she was recommissioned for wartime service.

    She saw her first action in the
    American War of Independence in July 1779 at the indecisive Battle of Grenada, when the British Fleet under the command of Vice Admiral Byron managed to avoid defeat from superior French forces.

    Albion's next action was a year later on 17 April 1780, when British and French fleets met in the
    Battle of Martinique. A month later, on 15 May, the fleets met again and after a few days of maneuvering the head of the British line confronted the rear-most French warships. Albion, leading the vanguard of the British fleet suffered heavy casualties, but with little to show for it. Just four days later the two fleets clashed for the third time but again it was indecisive with Albion heavily engaged as before, suffering numerous casualties in the process.
    She was paid off in the December of 1781 and underwent repairs and coppering at Chatham prior to rearming as a 22gun floating battery there.

    In 1794 Albion was consigned to the role of a 60-gun floating battery armed with heavy carronades and moored on the
    Thames Estuary. She was positioned in the Middle Swin, seven miles north-east of Foulness Point, under the command of Captain Henry Savage.

    Fate.

    In April 1797, while heading to a new position in the Swin Channel, off
    Maplin Sands and Foulness she ran aground due to pilot error. Two days later, during salvage efforts, her back broke, and she was completely wrecked. HMS Astraea rescued Captain Henry Savage and his crew. The crew later transferred to the newly-built HMS Lancaster. The subsequent court-martial blamed the pilots, William Springfield and Joseph Wright, for imprudent maneuvering and going too far back before altering course. The court ordered that they lose all pay due to them and they never serve as pilots again.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  2. #2
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    HMS Albion (1802)



    HMS Albion was a
    74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the modified Fame Class by Henslow. Built by Perry, Wells and Green,she was launched at Perry's Blackwall Yard on the Thames on 17 June 1802 and fitted out at Woolwich and Sheerness in 1803.



    History

    GREAT BRITAIN
    Name:
    HMS Albion
    Ordered:
    24 June 1800
    Builder:
    Perry, Wells & Green, Blackwall Yard
    Laid down:
    June 1800
    Launched:
    17 June 1802
    Honours and
    awards:
    Fate:
    Broken up, 1836
    General characteristics
    Class and type:
    Fame-classship of the line
    Tons burthen:
    ​1740 3294 bm
    Length:
    175 ft (53 m) (gundeck)
    Beam:
    47 ft 6 in (14.48 m)
    Depth of hold:
    20 ft 6 in (6.25 m)
    Propulsion:
    Sails
    Sail plan:
    Full rigged ship
    Armament:
    • Lower deck: 28 × 32-pounder guns
    • Upper deck: 28 × 18-pounder guns
    • QD: 2 × 18-pounder guns + 12 × 32-pounder carronades
    • Fc: 2 × 18-pounder guns + 2 × 32-pounder carronades
    • Roundhouse: 6 × 18-pounder carronades


    Napoleonic Wars.



    She was commissioned during her fitting out from the February of 1802 by Captain John Ferrier who continued in command until 1808.

    In the May of 1803 under the command of Ferrier and as the Flagship of Saumarez, she joined Admiral
    Cornwallis' fleet, which was blockading the vital French naval port of Brest. Albion, with Minataur and Thunderer took the 40 gun French Frigate La Franchaise and she was also amongst the vessels of the squadron that shared in the proceeds of the capture of:-

    Juffrow Bregtie Kaas (30 May 1803);
    Eendraght (31 May);
    Morgen Stern (1 June);
    Goede ferwachting (4 June);
    De Vriede (5 June).

    Albion was soon detached from the fleet to deploy to the
    Indian Ocean where she was to remain for several years.
    Albion and
    Sceptre left Rio de Janeiro on 13 October, escorting Lord Melville, Earl Spencer, Princess Mary, Northampton, Anna, Ann, Glory, and Essex. They were in company with the 74-gunthird rateships of the lineHMS Russell, and the fourth rateHMS Grampus. Three days later Albion and Scepter separated from the rest of the ships.
    On 21 December 1803, Albion and Sceptre captured the French privateer Clarisse at
    °18′S 95°20′E / 1.300°S 95.333°E / in the eastern Indian Ocean. Clarisse was armed with 12 guns and had a crew of 157 men. She had sailed from Isle de France (Mauritius) on 24 November with provisions for a six-month cruise to the Bay of Bengal. At the time of her capture she had not captured anything. Albion, Sceptre, and Clarisse arrived at Madras on 8 January 1804.

    On 28 February 1804, Albion and Sceptre met up in the straits of Malacca with the fleet of Indiamen that had just emerged from the
    Battle of Pulo Aura and conducted them safely to Saint Helena. From there HMS Plantagenet escorted the convoy to England.

    On 28 August 1808, Albion recaptured Swallow, which was carrying among other things, a quantity of gold dust.
    Next, Albion escorted to a fleet of nine
    East Indiamen returning to Britain. They left Madras on 25 October, but a gale that commenced around 20 November at 10°S 90°E / 10°S 90°E / -10; 90 by 22 November had dispersed the fleet. By 21 February three of the Indiamen —Lord Nelson, Glory, and Experiment— had not arrived at Cape Town. Apparently all three had foundered without a trace.
    Caroline, of Riga, arrived at Yarmouth on 17 August 1810 having been detained by Albion.


    War of 1812.


    In 1814, the year that Napoleon was finally toppled, and after a long period under extensive repair, she became flagship of Rear Admiral George Cockburn, taking part in a war (War of 1812) against the United States — a duty that the first Albion had once undertaken. In the summer of 1814, she was involved in the force that harried the coastline of Chesapeake Bay, where she operated all the way up to the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers, destroying large amounts of American shipping, as well as US government property. The operations ended once peace was declared in 1815.


    Post-war.

    Just a year later, Albion was part of a combined British-Dutch fleet taking part in the bombardment of Algiers on 27 August 1816, which was intended to force the Dey of Algiers to free Christian slaves. She fired 4,110 shots at the city, and suffered 3 killed and 15 wounded by return fire.



    Albion at the Battle of Navarino

    In 1827, she was part of a combined British-French-
    Russian fleet under the command of Admiral Codrington at the Battle of Navarino, where a Turkish-Egyptian fleet was obliterated, securing Greek independence. Albion suffered 10 killed and 50 wounded, including her second-in-command, Commander John Norman Campbell.




    In 1847 the Admiralty awarded the Naval General Service Medal with the clasps "Algiers", and "Navarino" to all surviving claimants from the battles.


    Fate.

    Albion was placed in ordinary in 1829 at Portsmouth. By mid 1830 she was being fitted out as a receiving ship, but completed as a lazarette in 1831. Then from 1832 to 35 she was in the quarantine service at Leith.
    She was finally broken up at
    Deptford Dockyard in the June of 1836.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Last edited by Bligh; 11-02-2019 at 15:29.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  3. #3
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    HMS Alcide (1779)

    Name:  Albion_Fortitude_Irresistible_Grafton_Alcide.jpg
Views: 15
Size:  65.6 KB

    HMS Alcide, the French and Italian version of "Alcides", another name for Heracles, was an Albion Class 74-gun third-rateship of the line,designed by Thomas Slade, M/shipwright Adam Hayes ordered on the 31st of August, 1774 and launched on the 30th of July, 1779 at Deptford Dockyard. She was fitted out and coppered at Plymouth between the April and June of 1780.




    History
    GREAT BRITAIN
    Name:
    HMS Alcide
    Ordered:
    31 August 1774
    Builder:
    Deptford Dockyard
    Laid down:
    4 June 1776
    Launched:
    30 July 1779
    Fate:
    Broken up, 1817
    Notes:
    General characteristics
    Class and type:
    Albion-classship of the line
    Tons burthen:
    1625
    Length:
    168 ft (51 m) (gundeck)
    Depth of hold:
    18 ft 10 in (5.74 m)
    Propulsion:
    Sails
    Sail plan:
    Full rigged ship
    Armament:
    • 74 guns:
    • Gundeck: 28 × 32-pounders
    • Upper gundeck: 28 × 18-pounders
    • Quarterdeck: 14 × 9-pounders
    • Forecastle: 4 × 9-pounders
    .
    She fought at the battles of
    Cape St Vincent off the southern coast of Portugal on the16th of January 1780 during the Anglo-Spanish War and Martinique also known as the Combat de la Dominique, which took place on the 17th of April 1780 during the American Revolutionary War in the West Indies. On the12th of September, 1780 Alcide captured the letter of marque Pocahontas. The Royal Navy took her into service as HMS Pocahontas.

    Her next outing in 1782 took her to the battles of
    St. Kitts on the 25th and 26th of January and the Saintes from the 9th to the 12th of April.

    Paid off after wartime service in the July of 1783, and had a small repair undertaken at Portsmouth completed in the December of 1784. She was recommissioned once more in the October of 1787 under Captain Benjamin Caldwell, and served as a guardship at Portsmouth in the May of 1790. She was under Captain Sir Andrew Snape Douglas for the period of the Spanish Armament and then returned to guardship duties until the March of 1793 when she was recommissioned under Captain John Woodley as the Flagship of Commodore Robert Linzee,for service in Admiral Hood's Fleet off Toulon. Whilst in the Med she also took part in the
    operations against Corsica in the September of 1793, and in the attack on Forneille on the first of October of that year.

    She was commanded by Captain Thomas Shivers from the May of 1794 as the Flagship of the newly promoted Rear Admiral Linzee. By the October of that year she was under Sir Thomas Byard as the Flagship of Vice Admiral Phillips Cosby.
    That November she was laid up in ordinary at Portsmouth, although she was listed as a receiving ship from1802 onwards.

    Alcide was finally broken up there in the May of 1817.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  4. #4
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    HMS Alexander (1778)


    Name:  John_Cleveley_the_Younger,_Launch_of_HMS_Alexander_at_Deptford_in_1778.jpg
Views: 13
Size:  134.3 KB
    Launch of HMS Alexander at Deptford in 1778 (BHC1875), by John Cleveley the Younger (NMM) - HMS Alexander is the ship still on the slipway, centre background


    HMS Alexander was a 74-gun Alfred Class
    third-rate ship of the Line designed by Sir John Williams. M/s Adam Hayes. Ordered on the 21st of July 1773, she was launched at Deptford Dockyard on 8 October 1778.



    History
    GREAT BRITAIN
    Name:
    HMS Alexander
    Ordered:
    21 July 1773
    Builder:
    Deptford Dockyard
    Laid down:
    6 April 1774
    Launched:
    8 October 1778
    Captured:
    6 November 1794, by French Navy
    FRANCE
    Name:
    Alexandre
    Acquired:
    6 November 1794
    Captured:
    22 June 1795, by Royal Navy
    GREAT BRITAIN
    Name:
    HMS Alexander
    Acquired:
    22 June 1795
    Honours and
    awards:
    Fate:
    Broken up, 1819
    General characteristics
    Class and type:
    Alfred-classship of the line
    Type:
    Third rate
    Tons burthen:
    1621 (bm)
    Length:
    169 ft (52 m) (gundeck)
    Beam:
    47 ft 2 in (14.38 m)
    Depth of hold:
    20 ft (6.1 m)
    Propulsion:
    Sails
    Sail plan:
    Full rigged ship
    Armament:
    • Gundeck: 28 × 32-pounder guns
    • Upper gundeck: 28 × 18-pounder guns
    • QD: 14 × 9-pounder guns
    • Fc: 4 × 9-pounder guns


    British service and capture.

    She was commissioned in the October of 1778. Then fitted out and coppered at Portsmouth in the December of 1779.
    On 13 March 1780, Alexander and
    HMS Courageaux captured the 40-gun French privateer Monsieur after a long chase and some exchange of fire. The Royal Navy took the privateer into service as HMS Monsieur.

    In the December of 1782 she was refitted and had her copper raised on each beam at Chatham.
    In the May of 1783 she was paid off following the secession of hostilities.

    In the October of 1791 she was fitted out at Chatham for Channel service, and commissioned under Captain Thomas West in the October of 1793.

    In 1794, whilst serving in Montague's Squadron and returning to England in the company of
    HMS Canada after escorting a convoy to Spain, Alexander, under the command of Rear-Admiral Richard Rodney Bligh, fell in with a French squadron of five 74-gun ships, and three frigates, led by Joseph-Marie Nielly. In the Action of the 6th of November, 1794 Alexander was overrun by the Droits de l'Homme, but escaped when she damaged the Droits de l'Homme's rigging. Alexander was then caught by Marat, which came behind her stern and raked her. Then, the 74 gun third-rateJean Bart closed in and fired broadsides at close range, forcing Bligh to surrender Alexander, having lost 40 killed and wounded in the action. In the meantime, Canada escaped. The subsequent court martial honourably acquitted Bligh of any blame for the loss of his ship.

    The French took her to Brest and then into their French Navy under the name Alexandre. On the 23rd June, 1795, she was with a French fleet off
    Belle Île when the Channel Fleet under Lord Bridport discovered them. The British ships chased the French fleet, and brought them to action in the Battle of Groix. During the battle HMS Sans Pareil and HMS Colossus recaptured Alexander. After the battle, HMS Révolutionnaire towed her back to Plymouth under the acting Captain Alexander Wilson.

    Return to British service.

    After a refit at Plymouth Alexander was recommissioned in 1796 under Captain Arthur Phillip for the Channel Fleet.
    In1797 under Captain Alexander Ball she sailed for the Med.

    Name:  HMS_Alexander_towing_HMS_Vanguard.jpg
Views: 13
Size:  30.6 KB

    Alexander towing Vanguard, May 1798

    In 1798 Nelson was detached into the Mediterranean by
    Earl St. Vincent with HMS Orion, Alexander, Emerald, Terpsichore, and Bonne Citoyenne. They sailed from Gibraltar on the 9th of May and on the 12th of May were struck by a violent gale in the Gulf of Lion that carried away Vanguard's topmasts and foremast. The squadron bore up for Sardinia, Alexander taking Vanguard in tow.

    The Alexander took part in the
    Battle of the Nile in 1798, still under the command of Captain Alexander Ball. On the evening of the 1st of August, 1798, half an hour before sunset, the battle began. She was the second ship to fire upon the French fleet engaging the flagship, L'Orient. The Alexander sank three French ships before she had to withdraw due to a small fire on board. The Alexander was one of the few ships not carrying a detachment of soldiers.

    Northumberland, Alexander, Penelope, Bonne Citoyenne, and the brig Vincejo shared in the proceeds of the French polacca Vengeance, captured entering Valletta, Malta on the 6th of April.

    In the February of 1800 she was placed under the acting command of Lt. William Harrington for the Genereux's convoy on the 18th of that month.

    By the following February she was under the command of Captain Manley Dixon.
    In the April of 1806 she was back in Portsmouth and being fitted out as a lazerarette.

    Fate.

    She was finally broken up at Portsmouth in the November of 1819.

    Alexander served in the navy's Egyptian campaign between the 8th of March,1801 and the 2nd of September, which qualified her officers and crew for the clasp "Egypt" to the Naval General Service Medal that the
    Admiralty issued in 1847 to all surviving claimants.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  5. #5
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    HMS Arrogant (1761)

    Name:  Illustrirte_Zeitung_(1843)_11_168_1_Der_Camperdown.PNG
Views: 14
Size:  56.2 KB
    HMS Arrogant was a 74-gun third rateship of the line, a modified Bellona class designed by Sir Thomas Slade M/shipwrights John Barnard and John Turner. Ordered on the 13th of December, 1758, she was launched on the 22nd of January, 1761 at Harwich. She was the first of the Arrogant class ships of the line of which only two were built during the Seven Years War. A further ten ships were subsequently built after 1773.



    History
    GREAT BRITAIN
    Name:
    HMS Arrogant
    Ordered:
    13 December 1758
    Builder:
    John Barnard & John Turner, Harwich Dockyard
    Laid down:
    March 1759
    Launched:
    22 January 1761
    Commissioned:
    January 1761
    Fate:
    Sold out o service, 1810
    General characteristics
    Class and type:
    Arrogant classship of the line
    Tons burthen:
    1644​5494 bm
    Length:
    • 168 ft 3 in (51.28 m) (gundeck)
    • 138 ft 0 in (42.06 m) (keel)
    Beam:
    47 ft 4 in (14.43 m)
    Depth of hold:
    19 ft 9 in (6.02 m)
    Sail plan:
    Full rigged ship




    Name:  il_fullxfull_1878824064_4i7y.jpg
Views: 14
Size:  139.4 KB


    Commissioned in the January of 1761 she was fitted as a guard ship at Portsmouth.
    Refitted and recommissioned in the of 1768 she continued in her role as a guard ship until paid of in the June of 1771.

    There followed a major refit and coppering of her bottom at Chatham from the July of 1780 until the July of the year following, After a smaller repair over the winter of 1774-75 she was fitted for service in the channel in the may of 1790. After further repairs in 1792 and 94 she was commissioned for service once more under the command of Captain Richard Lucas, following which she sailed for the East Indies on the 3rd of April, 1795.

    She was on passage in time to take part in the siege and capture of the Cape of Good Hope. On the 9th of September, 1796 she was in action with Victorious against Sercy's squadron off Sumatra.
    In the March of 1798 she was commanded for a short time by Captain Edward Packenham, and then from the June of that year until 1803 by Captain Edward Osborn.

    In the January of 1799 Arrogant was with the British squadron at the defence of
    Macau during the Macau Incident.

    By 1804 she had been converted to a hulk at Bombay where she served as a receiving ship,
    sheer hulk, and floating battery. In 1810 she was condemned as unfit for further service.

    She was sold out of service and broken up there later in the year of 1810.

    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  6. #6
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    HMS Audacious (1785)





    Name:  Audacious_A1.gif
Views: 10
Size:  16.6 KB
    HMS Audacious.



    HMS Audacious was a 74-gun third-rate Arrogant Class ship of the line M/Shipwright John Randall and Brent. She was ordered on the 22nd of October, 1782 and launched on the 23rd of July, 1785 at Rotherhithe. Completed at Deptford and Woolwich in the October of that year, she was the first ship in the British Navy to bear the name.



    History
    GREAT BRITAIN
    Name: HMS Audacious
    Builder: Randall, Rotherhithe
    Laid down: August 1783
    Launched: 23 July 1785
    Fate: Broken up, August 1815
    Notes: ·Participated in:
    ·Battle of the Nile
    General characteristics
    Class and type: Arrogant-classship of the line
    Tons burthen: 1624 bm
    Length: 168 ft (51 m) (gundeck)
    Beam: 46 ft 9 in (14.25 m)
    Depth of hold: 19 ft 9 in (6.02 m)
    Propulsion: Sails
    Sail plan: Full rigged ship
    Armament: ·74 guns:

    ·Gundeck: 28 × 32-pounders
    ·Upper gundeck: 28 × 18-pounders
    ·Quarterdeck: 14 × 9-pounders
    ·Forecastle: 4 × 9-pounders


    She was commissioned for service in the channel under Captain William Parker. On the 18th of November, 1793 she had a brush with Vanstable's Squadron, and was in action again on the 28th of May, 1794.



    Now under Captain Alexander Hood she sailed for the Med on the 23rd of May 1795. Audacious soon transferred to the command of Captain William Shield for the action off Hyeres on the 13th of July of that year.Next came her pursuit of Richery's fleet in September.

    Name:  c54e7728c55151f8834149496eb6cbf7.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  15.5 KB


    After this a return to Plymouth to effect repairs during the first three month of 1797. We saw her serving under Captain Davidge Gould in 1798. On the first of August of that year she took part in the Battle of the Nile, still under Gould's captaincy. During the battle she engaged the French ship Conquérant and helped to force her surrender.



    She became the Flagship of Vice Admiral Lord Keith 1n 1800,for the blockade of Genoa, and thence on to Malta.

    Name:  His_Majestys_Ship_Audacious.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  174.6 KB



    Recommissioned in the March of 1801 under Captain Henry Curzon for the Channel Fleet in the June of that year she came under the captaincy first of Captain Sir Robert Barlow and then in short order, Captain Shouldham Peard in the Squadron of Saumarez and went on to take an active part in the battle of Algesiras on the 6th of July of that year and following that at the Gut of Gibralter on the 12th of the same month.



    In the April of 1802,Audacious embarked for service in the Leeward islands, but was back for a refit at Plymouth between the April and August of 1805.Recommissioning took place under Captain John Lawford.



    In 1806 she saw service in Strachan's squadron under Captain John Lamour, and then Captain Matthew Scott.



    In 1807 she was in the Channel Fleet once more under Captain Thomas Le Marchant Gosselin, until 1809. During this period she saw service in the Baltic, at Corunna, and then in the operations off the Scheldt estuary.

    In the March of 1810,under Captain Donald Campbell she was at the Texel, and later that year sailed to Portugal.



    She was laid up in ordinary at Chatham in the November of 1811, and finally broken up there in the August of 1815.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  7. #7
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    13,659
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    HMS Bedford (1775)

    Name:  yG5o1UZ.jpg
Views: 9
Size:  50.6 KB
    Royal Oak Class

    HMS Bedford was a 74-gun third rate. ship of the line of the Royal Oak Class ordered in the December of 1768 and designed by Sir John Williams. M/ shipwright William Grey to the March of 1773 She was completed by Nicholas Phillips and launched on the 27th of October, 1775 at Woolwich.


    Name:  300px-'Bedford'_(1775)_RMG_J3365.png
Views: 9
Size:  36.7 KB
    Plan of Bedford



    History
    Great Britain
    Name:
    HMS Bedford
    Ordered:
    12 October 1768
    Builder:
    Woolwich Dockyard
    Laid down:
    October 1769
    Launched:
    27 October 1775
    Fate:
    Broken up, 1817
    Notes:
    General characteristics
    Class and type:
    Royal Oak-classship of the line
    Tons burthen:
    1606 (bm)
    Length:
    168 ft 6 in (51.4 m) (gundeck)
    Beam:
    46 ft 9 in (14.2 m)
    Depth of hold:
    20 ft (6.1 m)
    Propulsion:
    Sails
    Sail plan:
    Full rigged ship
    Armament:
    • Gundeck: 28 × 32-pounder guns
    • Upper gundeck: 28 × 18-pounder guns
    • QD: 14 × 9-pounder guns
    • Fc: 4 × 9-pounder guns


    Early service.

    Bedford was Commissioned in the December of 1777 for wartime service.

    American Revolutionary War.



    In 1780, Bedford fought at the
    Battle of Cape St Vincent. Later, she was part of the squadron under Vice-Admiral Mariot Arbuthnot. Under the command of Captain Sir Edmund Affleck, she fought in two engagements against the Comte de Grasse; at the Battle of St. Kitts (25–26 January 1782) under Admiral Samuel Hood, and the Battle of the Saintes (9–12 April 1782) under Admiral Rodney. Her crew was paid off and disbanded in the summer of 1783, and the vessel herself was put into ordinary.

    In 1987 she was fitted as a guard ship at Portsmouth Recommissioned under captain
    Robert Mann in the June of that year for the Spanish Armament.

    Paid off again in 1791 for some months she was a guard ship at Portsmouth under Captain Sir Andrew Snape Hammond. Then as flagship to Vice Admiral Mark Millbank in the Evolutionary squadron during 1792.
    Recommissioned in the January of 1793 under Captain Robert Mann once more, she sailed for the Med on the 22nd of May, 1793 to Join Admiral Hood's Fleet at Toulon. Mann remained with her until late 1794 and in the
    Raid on Genoa on the 17th of October succeeded in capturing the 36 gun Frigate La Modeste.

    French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

    In 1794 she came under the Flag of Sir Hyde Parker.In 1795 she was in the Mediterranean under Captain
    Davidge Gould. She was with Vice-Admiral Hotham's squadron off Genoa on 14 March when it captured Ça Ira and Censeur. During the engagement Bedford suffered such damage to her masts and rigging that she had to be towed out of the action. Bedford's casualties numbered seven men killed and 18 wounded, including her first lieutenant.

    Bedford was also present on 13 July when the British fleet engaged the Toulon fleet in an indecisive action. Only a few British vessels exchanged fire with the French before they withdrew. If Bedford participated at all, she did not suffer any casualties. The British did capture one vessel,
    Alcide, but she caught fire and blew up.

    In September 1795, Bedford was part of the force escorting 63 merchants of the Levant convoy from Gibraltar. The other escorts were the 74-gun ship
    HMS Fortitude, the frigates HMS Argo, the 32-gun frigates Juno and HMS Lutine, and the fireshipTisiphone, and the recently captured Censeur. The convoy called at Gibraltar on 25 September, at which point thirty-two of the merchants left that night in company with Argo and Juno. The rest of the fleet sailed together, reaching Cape St Vincent by the early morning of 7 October. At this point a sizable French squadron was sighted bearing up, consisting of six ships of the line and three frigates under Rear-Admiral Joseph de Richery. Eventually Censeur struck, and the remaining British warships and one surviving merchant vessel of the convoy made their escape. On 17 October Argo and Juno brought in to British waters their convoy of 32 vessels.

    Name:  300px-Thomas-Whitcombe-Battle-of-Camperdown.jpg
Views: 9
Size:  11.1 KB
    Battle of Camperdown by Thomas Witcombe.

    In 1797 Bedford saw action in Duncan's Fleet at the
    Battle of Camperdown on the 11th of October, 1797,under the command of Captain Sir Thomas Byard. During the action she suffered 30 killed and 41 wounded.

    By 1799 she was out of commission at Plymouth. The next year she was fitted out there as a
    prison ship. Between September 1805 and October 1807 Bedford underwent extensive repairs and then was prepared for foreign service. In October she was commissioned by Captain James Walker. To man Bedford the Navy transferred over Bellerophon's petty officers and crew.

    Bedford then joined Rear-Admiral Sir
    Sidney Smith who was assisting the Portuguese royal family in its flight from Lisbon to Rio de Janeiro. The flotilla that left Lisbon consisted of Marlborough, London, Monarch and Bedford, eight Portuguese ships of the line, four frigates, three brigs and a schooner, as well as many merchant vessels. Smith estimated the total number of Portuguese vessels as 37. The flotilla left on 11 November 1807 and reached Rio de Janeiro on 7 March 1808. While she was in Brazil Bedford was for a short time in 1808-9 under the command of Captain Adam Mackenzie (or M'Kenzie) of President.

    War of 1812.

    In September 1814 Captain Walker took command of a squadron that carried the advance guard of Major General Keane's army, which was moving to attack New Orleans. Bedford arrived off Chandeleur Island on 8 December 1814 and the troops started to disembark eight days later. Sir
    Alexander Cochrane and Rear-Admirals Pulteney Malcolm and Edward Codrington went ashore with the army. Between 12–14 December Bedford's boats, under the command of Lieutenant John Franklin, participated in the Battle of Lake Borgne, in which she lost one man killed and four or five men wounded, including Franklin and two other officers. Bedford then contributed most of her officers and 150 men to land operations. During these operations Franklin helped dig a canal to facilitate the movement of troops. By default Walker became senior officer of the ships of the line, which were anchored 100 miles from the battle area as the waters were too shallow to permit these largest vessels to approach more closely.

    Post-war and fate.

    Paid off in 1815, soon after news of the
    Treaty of Ghent, which had ended the war, arrived, Bedford and Iphigenia sailed to Jamaica. There they collected a home-bound convoy.

    In 1816 Bedford was taken out of commission at Portsmouth. She was broken up in 1817.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •