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Thread: Scratching building a 1/1200 Frigate - Enterprise class 1774

  1. #1

    Default Scratching building a 1/1200 Frigate - Enterprise class 1774

    Inspired by the Langton kits I'm working on I was inspired to give it a go and build something from scratch.





















    About a weeks worth of little often work.

    P

  2. #2

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    Progress has slowed as I puzzle over masts.



    I'm not happy with either option here, and so am likely to discard.

    Plastic rod is far easier to work, but steel rod has the necessary strength. I probably need to get hold of a range of small diameter brass rod/wire.

    I'm also distracted by a fresh order that has arrived from Langton Miniatures and oh boy is the 74 model nice !!!

  3. #3
    2nd Lieutenant
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    I use carbon fiber rod for RC planes for masts.

  4. #4

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    I was not happy with the shape of my first attempt, mainly due to the stern galleries being over sized for the size of ship and that I had added a shim shaped to the orlop, whereas it looks better when shaped to the gun deck, and so have made a second version.

    This took hardly any time compared to the first given I knew the way to go, and galleries are now a much better size.



    (new version at the front, with a newly arrived Langton 24 gun frigate at the rear for comparison.)

    Sorry the photo is not very good, but the plastic card reflects so much light that the shadows to give depth are lost.

    Dobbs - thanks for the suggestion, for the moment I've gone with micro brass tube, with the thought that I will solder the joints - we'll see how that works out when the brass arrives later this week.

  5. #5
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    I may be teaching my Grandmother to suck eggs Pete, but for very fine soldered joints, rather than offer up the stick of solder, file a few fine shavings off the stick and mix it with your flux before you paint it onto the joint. An old watchmaker gave me that tip many years ago.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  6. #6

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    Cheers for that Rob, soldering is not something I have ever really done, so that is a useful tip.

    P

  7. #7
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    For soldering you need a steady hand, super clean joints, flux, solder and sufficient heat. If you can work on a fire brick it helps reflect the heat all round the joint. Remember solder always runs to the hottest point so an even flame on both parts is essential to prevent a dry joint. Let it cool slowly to avoid fractures. Also try not to inhale the fumes. Once or twice won't do much harm but don't make a habit of it.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  8. #8

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    Cheers Rob for the info.

    The brass tube and soldering iron arrived earlier and I managed to create the necessary joints without much difficulty. Given this is a simple join, that I can tidy up with a file, I don't need to do much more than blob the solder on while keeping the mast elements straight to each other.



    1mm steel rod, 0.9, 0.7 & 0.5mm brass tube. The telescoping ability of the brass tube allows the 0.5mm tube (being the Royal) to sit inside the 0.7mm tube (the topgallant)

    P

  9. #9
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Nice job Pete, and thanks for the visual.
    Now you are proficient at mainmast you are ready to add cross trees.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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