View Poll Results: Have you sailed on the open ocean?

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  • Yes! On a large sailing vessel

    9 36.00%
  • Yes, but on a small craft or dinghy

    8 32.00%
  • Well, it didn’t have sails...

    2 8.00%
  • Sailing vessel but it was on a lake, river, or inlet.

    4 16.00%
  • Hey, I was on a cruise ship. Does that count?

    2 8.00%
  • Surf’s up! Surf board, paddle board, kayak.

    0 0%
  • I waded into the water.

    0 0%
  • I got my toes wet.

    0 0%
  • Lubber.

    0 0%
  • Lubber. But I did polish up the handles on the big fromtdoor!

    0 0%
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Thread: Have you actually been on the open ocean?

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  1. #1
    Landsman
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    Default Have you actually been on the open ocean?

    In a boat. More specifically, a wind-powered sail boat? Did you actually help handle the craft?

    Everything but the last two for me.

    Though I did polish up the handles so carefully...

    Edit in: “Open Ocean” is meant to include major seas, such as the Baltic, Black Sea, Mediterranean, Aegean, Caribbean, etc. I suppose the Adriatic or Gulf of Baja might be relatively calm, but go with your gut if you feel it was something a bit more adventuresome than placid.
    Last edited by Corsair; 03-18-2019 at 17:08.

  2. #2
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Thank you Sir Joseph.
    When I was at school we built three sailing dinghys in the school woodwork shops and sailed them on the River Trent.
    I must also mentioned that I have sailed the boards, having played the part of Sir Joseph in a school rendition of Pinafore.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  3. #3
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    A no to being on a sail ship, did travel out to Australia on the SS Canberra and returned to uk on the Himalaya a coyple of years later.
    Used a number of ferries travelling from Aberdeen to Lerwick and vice versa as well as a few channel ferries in my time

  4. #4
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    Is 31' a large sailing vessel or a small craft? We've done a few overnight passages with Grace (while carrying a pair of 74's and a gaggle of frigates and SoW's inside).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    Is 31' a large sailing vessel or a small craft? We've done a few overnight passages with Grace (while carrying a pair of 74's and a gaggle of frigates and SoW's inside).
    The US Coast Guard is exceedingly vague about what constitutes “small craft”. Basically, from their standpoint, anything threatened by conditions is small craft, which would seem to mean that it is a sliding scale. Having been on 30 footers on the Pacific, I’d call them small craft. The largest I’ve sailed on was the Serena, which I think was around 90 feet, and intended to sail vast distances on the open ocean, and I’d probably rate above small craft (though if things got bad enough, the Coast Guard would say was small craft). So...at your discretion to what you regard as small craft, I suppose.

  6. #6
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    From my perspective of sailing in dinghies, anything larger than one with two sails is a large craft.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  7. #7
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    Baltic sea and (regularly) in the Dutch coastal waters. Not yet real "Blue water sailing".

  8. #8
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    I have sailed to the Isle of Man and back on a ferry.

  9. #9
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    78 ft brig in the Mediterranean. It's not really an ocean, but some say Mediterranean is part of the Atlantic so I checked the top.

  10. #10
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Guess that puts you up there with the best so far Jonas.
    Hope we hear from a few more shipmates soon.
    I'm sure a few more must have sailing experience.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexaS View Post
    78 ft brig in the Mediterranean. It's not really an ocean, but some say Mediterranean is part of the Atlantic so I checked the top.
    I think the Mediterranean meets the qualifications. It's got to be one of the Seven Seas!

    I counted Grace as a very small large sailing vessel, and went with the top one too.

    P.S. We just hopped up the coast from Saint Augustine to the St John's inlet, a mixture of light wind sailing and motoring. The weather was sublime. That evening, we got thumped by a thunderstorm at the dock! It would have been easier on the ocean!

  12. #12
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    Sailed from S.W. England to Scotland, back south to Gibraltar, through the Med to Greece and back to South of France. Took us 8 years, our crossing of the Bay of Biscay was so calm we motored all the way until we hit a thunderstorm off the coast of Spain.
    So we sailed a very small part of the Atlantic Ocean but a lot of the Irish and Mediterranean Sea in a 35' sail boat. I don't consider our boat to be a large craft but it's not a dinghy either.
    Cheers

  13. #13
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    I am sure that is a story worth the telling John.
    Have you been following Dobb's voyage?
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    I am sure that is a story worth the telling John.
    Have you been following Dobb's voyage?
    Rob.
    Not yet, I saw the thread with the link and when time allows will have a look.
    Cheers

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    Not yet, I saw the thread with the link and when time allows will have a look.
    Cheers
    Your adventure sounds much bigger than mine, John! I would love to sail those places someday.

    I agree with your assessment of large crafts. I also feel that sea-capable small sailboats are a cut above small crafts.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    Your adventure sounds much bigger than mine, John! I would love to sail those places someday.

    I agree with your assessment of large crafts. I also feel that sea-capable small sailboats are a cut above small crafts.
    "sea-capable small sailboats are a cut above all crafts" I think this is what you meant to say

  17. #17
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    It has been some years now but when I crewed on Kalmar Nyckel I sailed off the east coast of the US on the way from the Mid-Atlantic to New York and New England. Not sure what is worse on a large sailing vessel rough conditions or climbing an oscillating mast while riding a swell in light airs.


    Photo below. Jonas will note the Swedish flag on the main mast. The original was a Dutch built ship used by the Swedes to establish a trading post in the new world in 1638. Couldn't help but include a photo of "Toolbox" the ship's cat who passed away several years ago.

    Name:  Kalmar Nyckel under sail.jpg
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    Name:  Toolbox_of_the_Kalmar_Nyckel.jpg
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  18. #18
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    Not only a magnificent feat Eric, but also a magnificent ship, and a magnificent cat.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeRuyter View Post
    It has been some years now but when I crewed on Kalmar Nyckel I sailed off the east coast of the US on the way from the Mid-Atlantic to New York and New England. Not sure what is worse on a large sailing vessel rough conditions or climbing an oscillating mast while riding a swell in light airs.


    Photo below. Jonas will note the Swedish flag on the main mast. The original was a Dutch built ship used by the Swedes to establish a trading post in the new world in 1638. Couldn't help but include a photo of "Toolbox" the ship's cat who passed away several years ago.

    Name:  Kalmar Nyckel under sail.jpg
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    Name:  Toolbox_of_the_Kalmar_Nyckel.jpg
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    Eric,
    The Kalmar sailed passed my place last summer (or was it the summer before last...oh dear I've reached that age)....here's one of the photos I quickly snapped. I was reading on one of my balconies, looked up and saw her about to go by so I hurriedly took the picture with my phone -- sorry it isn't a better quality.
    Bill
    Name:  Kalmar Nyckel 3.jpg
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  20. #20
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    Many Swedish ships of that time were Dutch designed and some also Dutch built. Wasa, famous for its disastrous maiden voyage, was originally of Dutch design until the King demanded more guns resulting in an extra gun deck.
    Kalmar is a coastal town on east coast of southern Sweden.
    There's also the Finnish flag as Finland was a part of Sweden until two hundred years ago when Russia decided it was part of Russia instead. During the Russian revolution Finland came to the conclusion that was not the case and became independent.

    What a handsome cat!

    Edit: Funny reflection... I think La Grace as a brig has a greater number of sails than Kalmar Nyckel. The number of sails slowly increased over time until after the end of the Napoleonic wars when they suddenly almost doubled. I have sailed on Tre Kronor af Stockholm too, another brig but built after a brig from about 1845 I think.
    Last edited by TexaS; 03-11-2019 at 11:10.

  21. #21
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    As you probably know Jonas, we had a King like that.
    Hence our Mary Rose.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  22. #22
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    Interestingly enough that King was a genius in war on land. He was Gustav II Adolf or Gustavus Adolphus as he is often called.

  23. #23
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    When I was a teen I learned to sail a small dinghy in the Blackwater estuary at Bradwell on Sea. Years later, I also helped crew a friend's 34 ft sailboat for a days sailing in the same estuary. My stepdaughter crewed on a Round the World race yacht from Cape Town to Boston, her only previous experience being sailing around the isle of Wight a few times to give her some idea of how a yacht worked. She did well for a girl from Iowa. She loved every minute of it.


    Oops, I just realised, I checked the wrong box, it should have been the 'inlet' one, not the 'open ocean' one. My apologies
    Last edited by Bilge Rat; 03-12-2019 at 10:17.

  24. #24

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    I sailed for several weeks on the Fantome near the Bahamas, Bimini, Gun Key, etc. It was a 300 foot (679 ton) steel hulled stay sail schooner. It was built by the Duke of Westminster in 1927, and sold to A. E. Guinness (the brewery heir) in 1930. I sailed on it in 1976. It was lost at sea in a storm off Latin America in 1998. I've attached a photo below:

    Name:  Fantome 2.jpg
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    The following year, I also sailed along the Brazilian coast in the 40 foot sloop "Horseman of the Moon" (translated from the Portuguese).

  25. #25
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Yep!! I think that counts Bill.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  26. #26
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    Last year I sailed a Hunter 35.5 from Croatia down the back of Italia and on to Corfu. Lots of adventures ... the most heart racing being ambushed by a gunboat from the Guardia Finanza during a night sail off the coast of Brindisi.

  27. #27
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    Ah the Guardia di Finanza, remember driving from Naples to Latina with the cig ration for the uk team, they thought they had hit paydirt until I showed my id card and travel docs and pointed out my AFI number plate, around the next bend got pulled up by the Carabineri for speeding, so in my best Northern english accent asked Ay up whats matter Officer, flashed my id again got told to sod off in Italian and told not to do it again.
    I take my hat off t9 you sailor chaps. I get seasick in the shower

  28. #28
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    Nice shot. I was onboard for the Tall Ships 2000 in New York and we sailed up the Hudson, well briefly just to the GW and back for a ship parade. Of course New York has it's own 17th century tall ship - the Halve Maen - Henry Hudson's ship.

  29. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeRuyter View Post
    Nice shot. I was onboard for the Tall Ships 2000 in New York and we sailed up the Hudson, well briefly just to the GW and back for a ship parade. Of course New York has it's own 17th century tall ship - the Halve Maen - Henry Hudson's ship.
    Yes the Halve Maen passes my place twice per summer season (although I hear that now it is operating in Europe) -- here's a couple of photos:
    Name:  Half Moon 4.jpg
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    Name:  Half Moon 7.jpg
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    best,
    Bill

  30. #30
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    You lucky chaps.
    Having all these ships passing by.
    I have to go to Bristol or Gloucester docks to see such sights.
    That is the problem with living in the heart of the Midlands.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  31. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    That is the problem with living in the heart of the Midlands.
    I'm sure its not the only one

  32. #32
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Manley View Post
    I'm sure its not the only one
    It's strange Dave, but you can put up with almost everything else except being over 80 miles from the sea.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeRuyter View Post
    Nice shot. I was onboard for the Tall Ships 2000 in New York and we sailed up the Hudson, well briefly just to the GW and back for a ship parade.
    That's great! I had no idea how close we came to meeting 20 years ago. That same week, Suzanne and I were sailing our first cruising sailboat up to Connecticut to rendezvous with the OpSail fleet. We crossed paths with the fleet on the Chesapeake and New York harbor. I was a professional juggler and that was one of my last major gigs before switching over to working on sailboats.

  34. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    That's great! I had no idea how close we came to meeting 20 years ago. That same week, Suzanne and I were sailing our first cruising sailboat up to Connecticut to rendezvous with the OpSail fleet. We crossed paths with the fleet on the Chesapeake and New York harbor. I was a professional juggler and that was one of my last major gigs before switching over to working on sailboats.
    Hey Dobbs,
    I know a couple of accountants who might qualify for the title "professional juggler".. Perchance you weren't a Flying Kamarazov Brother were you?
    Bill

  35. #35
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    For me, its a 2000 mile trip west or a 1200 mile trip east to get to a beach. The great lakes LOOK like the sea but they smell like pond..... even the gulls sound different.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bilge Rat View Post
    For me, its a 2000 mile trip west or a 1200 mile trip east to get to a beach. The great lakes LOOK like the sea but they smell like pond..... even the gulls sound different.
    I know what you mean about the gulls sounding different. Here at the top of the Chesapeake Bay it's fresh water, and our gulls sound different too!

    As an aside, since we are nowhere near the sea, we call them Bay gulls. Nearby is the C and D canal, which, until it was dredged into a through canal, meant we had Locks and Bay Gulls.

  37. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbs View Post
    I know what you mean about the gulls sounding different. Here at the top of the Chesapeake Bay it's fresh water, and our gulls sound different too!

    As an aside, since we are nowhere near the sea, we call them Bay gulls. Nearby is the C and D canal, which, until it was dredged into a through canal, meant we had Locks and Bay Gulls.
    OOOFFF !!!!

  38. #38
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    Fortunately, my wife is Jewish otherwise I would never have got that....even so, people have been keelhauled for less...just sayin

  39. #39
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    That is so bad Dobbs it is nearly worthy of me.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  40. #40
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    The closest I've been is whale watching in the Santa Barbara Channel and ferries on the Great Lakes and the Solent.

    I suppose it's somewhat fitting that I'm drinking Cutty Sark scotch at the moment.

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