View Poll Results: Have you sailed on the open ocean?

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  • Yes! On a large sailing vessel

    12 30.77%
  • Yes, but on a small craft or dinghy

    10 25.64%
  • Well, it didn’t have sails...

    5 12.82%
  • Sailing vessel but it was on a lake, river, or inlet.

    8 20.51%
  • Hey, I was on a cruise ship. Does that count?

    3 7.69%
  • Surf’s up! Surf board, paddle board, kayak.

    0 0%
  • I waded into the water.

    1 2.56%
  • I got my toes wet.

    0 0%
  • Lubber.

    0 0%
  • Lubber. But I did polish up the handles on the big fromtdoor!

    0 0%
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Thread: Have you actually been on the open ocean?

  1. #51
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    They have done the same with the SS Great Britain Eric. There is a trickle of water flowing over the glass around the hull so that when you are above it looks as if she is floating and when you go below to view the outside of the lower hull you seem to be under water when you look up.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  2. #52
    1st Lieutenant
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    They have done the same with the SS Great Britain Eric. There is a trickle of water flowing over the glass around the hull so that when you are above it looks as if she is floating and when you go below to view the outside of the lower hull you seem to be under water when you look up.
    Rob.
    She is on the list for my next trip across the pond! Also the HMS Trincomalee, more in our period!

  3. #53
    1st Lieutenant
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeRuyter View Post
    She is on the list for my next trip across the pond! Also the HMS Trincomalee, more in our period!
    Let me know when you're going and I'll stow away in your luggage! I've been a fan of I. K. Brunel since I was a kid.

  4. #54
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    I have been involved on and off with the Great Britain ever since I was at college.
    It just so happened that the pub outside the campus where most of us gathered was run by a very nice chap who also happened to be a magisterate and could get us an extended licence whenever a 21st party or engagement etc came up. More important, he was a Bristolian and was raising money to bring the GB home from the Falklands. we all contributed to the funds although we really did not have a clue at that time what it was really all about.
    The first real interest I actually had was when they towed her up the cut to her old dry dock where she was built. As the years went by I watched as the renovation gradually took place. I even got a piece of her old deck when they replaced some of that and sold off sections fashioned into doorstops, cut to show not only the old square shanked nails but even some of the original caulking embeded in the doorstop.
    My last visit was two years ago with Mrs Bligh, and I would have been back this year but for this plague ravaging the world.
    Well maybe next year!

    The most odd thing was that I ended up teaching the History of engineering to my students, and guess who waxed very large on the syllabus.

    Last edited by Bligh; 04-03-2020 at 14:11.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  5. #55
    1st Lieutenant
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    That's just the greatest picture of "the Little Giant"!

  6. #56
    Comptroller of the Navy Board
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    [RESTRICTED]

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    Caribbean cruise (Tampa-Cozumel), my high school graduation present. My mother booked the whole family on Carnival, and I wish we'd just stayed on land for how poorly maintained and unable to deliver on itinerary the ship was. (Had to completely miss Key West and the Hemingway festival, which was a big part of the entire point...)
    --Diamondback
    PMH, SME, TLA, BBB

  7. #57
    2nd Lieutenant
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    When I was 14, living in Kingston, crossing Port Royal Harbour during a gale in a 7 foot dinghy with two other idiot kids. Scared the hell out of us!
    Out of Seward through the Gulf of Alaska during another gale, trying to cross to Kodiak Island in a 26 ft cabin cruiser in the mid 80's. Again kissed the ground when we made it to shore!
    Not very pleasant memories

  8. #58
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    Ah... Memories of hard weather at sea. I crossed the Channel when the SeaCats couldn't be used due to the heavy weather. They used the old SR N4 hovercraft instead and there were some really nice jumps/falls when it tossed on the waves. I may be weird because I like it.

  9. #59
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    I have only ever experienced one bad storm. That was crossing the North sea from Harwich to the Hook. Six hour journey which took eight, and I was perfectly OK, and even had my normal meals and a few drinks.That was until I disembarked. Took me two days before I was eating again and the ground stopped coming up to meet me.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  10. #60
    Landsman
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    In the summer of 1985, whilst serving with the British Army in Gibraltar, I spent a week as part of the crew of a racing yacht 'The British Soldier'. We sailed in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. It's the one and only time. It was an extraordinary experience.
    How did it come about? (Sorry) My friends volunteered me whilst I was on leave!!

  11. #61
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Firstly allow me to give you a formal welcome to the Anchorage Paul, and secondly say that you seem to have the sort of credentials to make you very at home amongst us all.
    Please do remember to sign in on the Welcome Aboard Forum Brithsh sub section as your shipmates will then see that they have a new oppo.
    May you always sail with a fair wind and a willing foe.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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