Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: John Paul Jones and the Bonhomme Richard

  1. #1
    Able Seaman
    United States

    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Iowa
    Log Entries
    86
    Name
    Steve

    Default John Paul Jones and the Bonhomme Richard

    Book Title:
    John Paul Jones and the Bonhomme Richard
    Author:
    Jean Boudriot translated by David Roberts
    ISBN:
    0-87021-892-1
    Category:
    History
    Format:
    Hardback
    Summary:
    Published in 1987 by the Naval Institute Press (in the US), the author, Jean Boudriot is a leading authority in the world of French sailing ships of war.
    This book of 127 pages gives the reader a clear idea of the French East India Company ship Duc De Duras and her conversion to the warship Bonhomme Richard in beautifully illustrated detail.
    There are a number of color artworks both full page and detailed of the ships, equipment, crew etc to accompany the narrative and a fully detailed minute by minute description of the action between Bonhomme Richard and HMS Serapis is a real highlight. Not only does it discuss the commanders decisions but there are also drawings of the relative positions of the two ships at various stages of the battle.
    The book ends with a thorough description of Bonhomme Richards construction including a large number of line drawings, in much the same style as Conways ‘History of the Ship’ series.
    The book is an extremely enjoyable read and I wholeheartedly recommend it.

    I found my copy in an antique store so I am unsure if this publication is still available.
    Last edited by Bilge Rat; 01-05-2019 at 14:25.

  2. #2
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    12,957
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    Well I will certainly keep a weather eye out for it Steve.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •