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Thread: Nautical related Taverns.

  1. #551
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    Admiral of the Fleet Edward Hawke, 1st Baron Hawke, KB, PC was a Royal Navy officer. As captain of the third-rate HMS Berwick he took part in the Battle of Toulon in February 1744 during the War of the Austrian Succession.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  2. #552
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    Admiral Sir Henry Harvey, KB (July 1743 – 28 December 1810) was a long-serving officer of the British Royal Navy during the second half of the eighteenth century. Harvey participated in numerous naval operations and actions and especially distinguished himself at the Glorious First of June in command of HMS Ramillies. His career took him all over the world, particularly on the North American station and in the West Indies where he commanded numerous ships and, later in his career, squadrons during the course of three different wars. Harvey was a member of a distinguished naval family, his brother was killed in action in 1794, three of his sons entered the navy and one of them was later raised to admiral himself.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  3. #553
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    This pub is in Plymouth.

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    This is the back view.

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    It is a pity that the picture of the aircraft is incorrect.

    A real Supermarine Walrus. They were launched by catapult from cruisers and battleships as spotter planes but also found themselves in other roles like air-sea rescue, anti-submarine patrol and on rare occasions a light bomber.

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    Last edited by Naharaht; 04-15-2018 at 10:43.

  4. #554
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    This pub is in Monument Street, London.

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  5. #555
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    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  6. #556
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    Still in London, this Walrus is in Westminster Bridge Road.

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  7. #557
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  8. #558
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    The Admiral Stopford Arms is in Plymouth.
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    Admiral Sir Robert Stopford served in the Royal Navy for over 60 years in a career stretching from the French Revolutionary Wars to the Syrian War.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert..._Navy_officer)

  9. #559
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    William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock, GCB (9 July 1753 – 20 August 1825) was the Governor of Newfoundland and an admiral in the Royal Navy
    Waldegrave was the second son of John Waldegrave, 3rd Earl Waldegrave, and Elizabeth (née Gower). Joining the navy at age 13 in 1766, Waldegrave rose rapidly through the ranks, receiving his own command, the sloop HMS Zephyr in 1775, and being promoted to vice-admiral in 1795. He was the third in command on the British side at the Battle of Cape St Vincent in February 1797, and was offered a baronetcy for the role he played in the battle. Waldegrave declined the offer (on the grounds that as a son of an earl, he already held a higher station), and was appointed the Governor of Newfoundland, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, on 16 May 1797.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  10. #560
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    This pub is in New Braunfels, Texas.

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  11. #561
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    Another Benbow.

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    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  12. #562
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    This pub is at Puerto del Carmen in the Canary Islands.

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  13. #563
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  14. #564
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    This bar is in Napier, New Zealand.

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  15. #565
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    The Famous Fox Hound



    In 1767 sixteen year old Lemuel Parken left his home in Wilmslow, Cheshire, and walked to Portsmouth to join the Royal Navy, not knowing that he would one day create a legend in the village of Brixton in Devon.

    With a letter of introduction from Captain Drury, a shipmate of his father the Reverend George Parken, Lemuel was accepted into the Navy as a Volunteer First Class. Having been educated by his father, it did not take long for his superiors to discover he could read and write, was good at mathematics and knew the classics, Greek and Latin. Thanks to his Menorcan mother, he was fluent in Spanish and inherited her swarthy good looks.

    His promotion was rapid and at the age of twenty he was rated Master, making him responsible for ship navigation, pilotage and midshipman’s training. As such he was the senior warrant officer on board.

    A young Cornish Midshipman, Edward Pellew, then came under his care and became this country’s most successful frigate captain Sir Edward Pellew, Viscount Exmouth. When Pellew was appointed to his first command he insisted on Lemuel becoming his ship’s master and together they spent several years capturing many enemy ships and enjoying the high rewards of prize money.

    His fortune made, Lemuel was introduced to Edward Pellew’s brother, who was Controller of Customs. Lemuel was invited to leave the Navy and join the Revenue Service as a Commander. His first mission was to clear the Yealm River and its estuary of smuggling and illicit trading with the Bretons. He discovered that their link was a woman known by the colourful name of Black Joan, who was able to signal from the Mewstone at Wembury. So widespread was the smuggling situation at the time that even a Royal Navy frigate had been caught in the act.

    Lemuel was given command of an American-built cutter “The Foxhound”, faster and more heavily armed than a normal Customs vessel. Raising a crew from ex-shipmates and using all of their past experience, they discovered the source of the smuggling ring to be at Cofflete Creek at Brixton Torr. One cold wet November night in 1785, the “Foxhounds” laid an ambush and on the given signal attacked the smugglers, capturing no less than forty of them in Cofflete Creek Mill. The prisoners, including ten Bretons, were brought to trial in the Assize Room above what is now the restaurant of this Public House.

    The local magistrate found them guilty and they were submitted for sentence at Plymouth, from whence they were transported to the Colonies for life. Black Joan was banished to Looe Island in Cornwall. So pleased were the authorities with this result that they rewarded Lemuel by giving him the lease of these premises for his own use. He named it “The Famous Fox Hound Inn” and ran it as a successful coaching inn. In time, the “famous” was dropped and the origins of the inn became confused with hunting.

    Retiring to his mother’s birthplace, Es Castell on the island of Menorca, Lemuel lived to the grand old age of eighty-nine and lies buried in the English officers’ Cemetery above the town.


    Edward Boyle, April 1999 .



    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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