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Thread: Copenhagen 1801. The Danish Captains.

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    Default Copenhagen 1801. The Danish Captains.

    Denmark-Norway.

    Fischer's division in the King's Deep.

    (order south–north. Only Siælland and Holsteen were in good condition, also note the age of the ships.)

    Prøvesteenen 52/56 (3-decker battleship, rebuilt as a two-deck defensionsskib ("Defense-ship"), Kaptain L. F. Lassen
    Wagrien 48/52 (2-decker ship of the line, 1775), Kaptajn F.C. Risbrich
    Rendsborg 20 (pram), Kaptajnløjtnant C.T. Egede
    Nyborg 20 (pram) Kaptajnløjtnant C.A. Rothe
    Jylland 48/54 (Originally 70 gun 2-decker ship of the line, 1760), Kaptajn E.O. Branth
    Sværdfisken 18/20 (radeau, 1764), Sekondløjtnant S.S. Sommerfeldt
    Kronborg 22 (frigate, 1779), Premierløjtnant J.E. Hauch
    Hajen 18/20 (radeau, 1793), Sekondløjtnant J.N. Müller
    Dannebrog 60 (flag, 2-decker ship of the line, 1772), Kaptajn F.A. Bruun
    Elven 10 (frigate, 1800), Kaptajnløjtnant H. Holsten
    Flådebatteri No. 1 20 (Grenier's float/Floating Battery No. 1 1787), Søløjtnant Peter Willemoes
    Aggershus 20 (Defensionsfartøj "Defence vessel") 1786), Premierløjtnant T. Fassing
    Siælland 74 (2-decker ship of the line, 1776), Kaptajn F.C.L. Harboe
    Charlotte Amalia 26 (Old Danish East Indiaman), Kaptajn H.H. Kofoed
    Søehesten 18 (radeau 1795), Premierløjtnant B.U. Middelboe
    Holsteen 60 (ship of the line, 1772), Kaptajn J. Arenfelt
    Indfødsretten 64 (2-decker ship of the line, 1778), Kaptajn A. de Turah
    Hielperen 16 (Defensionsfregat "Defence frigate"), Premierløjtnant P.C. Lilienskiold


    Fischer's division in the Inner Run.

    (These ships did not see action)
    Elephanten 70
    Mars 74
    Sarpen 18-gun brig
    Nidelven 18-gun brig
    Danmark 74
    Trekroner 74 (not to be confused with Tre Kroner fortress)


    Fortifications.

    Sea battery TreKroner 68 guns. Major S.K. Meyer.

    Sea Battery Lynetten ? guns.
    Land battery Sixtus ? guns.
    Land battery Quintus ? guns.
    Fortress Kastellet ? guns.


    Steen Bille's division.

    These ships did not see action, the list is incomplete. Around 14 modern ships of the line and the same number of smaller ships were kept in the harbour.

    Iris 40
    Nykøbing
    Aalborg
    Christiansund
    Arendal
    Langesund
    Odense
    Flensborg
    Stege
    Staværn
    Viborg
    Naskau


    Rob.
    Last edited by Bligh; 05-18-2017 at 14:58.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Name:  Carl Adolph Rothe.jpg
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    Kaptajnløjtnant Carl Adolph Rothe.


    (December 8, 1767 – July 12, 1834) was a naval officer in the Royal Danish Navy and governor of the Danish West Indies from 1820 to 1822.

    Biography .

    Rothe was born on December 8, 1767 in Tybjerggård on Zealand, Denmark, to parents Tyge Jesper Rothe and Karen Bjørn
    The Rothe family originates from Germany, coming to Denmark in the end of the 17th century
    On January 12, 1811 he married Benedicte Ulfsparre de Tuxen (1790-1877) in Helsingør, the daughter of Louis de Tuxen and Charlotte Elisabeth Klingfeldt. The couple had no less than eight children: Louis, Anna Rosine, Andrea Bjørn, Karen, Charlotte Elisabeth, Martha Gustava, Margrethe Christine and Louise.
    Rothe joined the Danish navy as a naval volunteer (cadet) in 1778 and on April 2, 1783 he was commissioned as an officer in the rank of a Second Lieutenant.


    Copenhagen.

    In his naval career Rothe, fought in the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801 against the British fleet, commanding the ship (pram) Nyborg. He was promoted to the rank of Captain in 1806, and served as the second in command of the ship Prinds Christian Frederik under command of captain Carl W. Jessen from December 24, 1807. He participated in the battle of Battle of Zealand Point on March 22, 1808 which he survived as the second in command of Prinds Christian Frederik. After that battle, in which he was wounded, he spent two months as an English prisoner of war in Göteborg, Sweden.
    He was promoted to the rank of Counter Admiral as of April 16, 1833. From November 11, 1808 until July 25, 1814 Carl was governor of Bornholm and Christiansø, and was the governor of the Virgin Islands in the Danish West Indies from 1820 to 1822. He died, 66 years old, in Copenhagen on July 12, 1834. He is buried on Holmens Cemetery.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Sekondløjtnant Jochum Nicolay Müller.

    (born 1 February 1775 in Trondheim, Norway) was a naval officer who, as a midshipman, excelled at mathematics. As a junior lieutenant he met Horatio Nelson, and as a captain commanded the Finnmark squadron. He finally rose to the rank of Vice Admiral in the independent Royal Norwegian Navy.

    Career.

    J N Müller joined the navy as a volunteer cadet in 1789, becoming a midshipman four years later. At the naval academy he won the Gerner medal for excellence in mathematics in 1795 and graduated as a junior lieutenant in 1776. He was second in command of the cutter Forsvar on the Norwegian coast, before undertaking a cruise to the Danish West Indies on the frigate Iris. In April 1801, as war between Denmark and Britain approached, he was in command of the small gunboat Hajen (the heron).

    Battle of Copenhagen (1801).

    During the Battle of Copenhagen (1801), the little Hajen was posted beside the blockship Dannebrog with its crew of 357 men. The Danish defence line withstood nearly four hours of intense bombardment from the British fleet, returning fire in good measure, until the Dannebrog had lost one third of its complement, caught fire, and exploded. Hajen received a good proportion of the shots aimed at the Dannebrog and eventually had to strike. Müller was taken prisoner and conveyed to Nelson's flagship, where he came face to face with Horatio Nelson, the enemy himself. Müller described the admiral as a small, gaunt man with a strong presence, wearing a green Russian-style (kalmyk) overcoat and a three-cornered hat. The resolute, near crazy, defence had made a deep impression on the attackers. A British captain vouchsafed to Müller that never had the British navy experienced such a warm reception - not from the Dutch, the French or the Spanish. Later that year he served in the cadet training ship Fredericksværn and was promoted to senior lieutenant in 1802. In 1806, as captain of the pilot boat Allart. he sailed to Saint Petersburg where the ship was donated to the Russian navy. There Müller met Czar Alexander I when the latter came aboard.

    Second Battle of Copenhagen (1807).

    Müller was in command of the gunboat Flensborg in September 1807, when the British seized it and many other vessels after the Danes capitulated following the second Battle of Copenhagen. Flensborg did not make it back to Britain; she was lost in the storm in the Kattegat.

    After a spell in 1808 - 1810 in command of a gunboat division on the Norwegian border with Sweden, Müller was promoted to captain and given command of the brig Lougen, which was to sail with HDMS Langeland to the North Cape of Norway together with three newly completed Norwegian Gunships. As commander of this Finnmark Squadron in 1810, he re-established Norway's control of the trade route to northern Russia, which British warships had interdicted. He was also instrumental in rebuilding the harbour defences at Hammerfest. While she was returning to Trondheim with eleven large ships taken as prizes in September, Lougen ran aground on an reef south of Bodø and was nearly lost.

    In 1811 Müller was again in command of the Finnmark squadron, which in that year comprised four Norwegian gunships and five other armed vessels - but no brigs. Much of his work then consisted in improving the very elementary maps of the area, and charting the seaways around North Cape and the Nordkinn Peninsula.
    Following his sojourn in the far north, Müller was severely affected by arthritis and on sick leave for much of 1812. When he returned to duty he was responsible in August 1813 for successfully escorting a regiment of soldiers over the Great Belt to the island of Langeland despite the British blockade.

    Later Life.

    One year after the Treaty of Kiel and the short war with Sweden, Müller sought release from his duties to the Danish King (Frederick VI), who was loath to lose such an effective officer. The King gave Müller permission to stay in Norway for two years, but this assignment was later made permanent.
    In 1841 Müller reached the rank of Vice-Admiral in the Royal Norwegian Navy. He died on 2 January 1848 and is buried in Oslo, then known as Christiana.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Commodore Johan Olfert Fischer.

    (4 August 1747 – 18 February 1829) was a Danish officer in the Royal Dano-Norwegian Navy. He commanded the Dano-Norwegian fleet against British forces under Lord Nelson during the Battle of Copenhagen on 2 April 1801.

    Life and career.

    Johan Olfert Fischer was born in Copenhagen in 1747, the son of the Danish Vice Admiral Olfert Fasvier Fischer whom he followed to a naval career.While still a young man, his rise through the military ranks was set back and almost destroyed in an incident with a prostitute while he was on guard duty on the island of Holmen off Copenhagen. The prostitute compounded Fischer's disgrace by accusing him of violent assault and her charges were believed by a military court: Fischer, then a lieutenant, was punished and demoted back to common seaman for a period of one year.]
    By 1784, however, Fischer had rebuilt his reputation enough to be promoted to captain, and he was dispatched to the West Indies as commander of the warship Bornholme. It was during this three-year mission that he first met — on friendly terms — his future foe Nelson, then a captain aboard HMS Boreas.

    Battle of Copenhagen.

    By 1801, Fischer had risen to the rank of commodore and was appointed to lead the critical naval defense of Copenhagen during the French Revolutionary Wars. Aboard his flagship Dannebrog, he attempted to organize a comprehensive defense with which to face Nelson's invading British armada. The Dannebrog, however, caught fire early in the battle and Fischer was forced to transfer his command, first to a different ship and then, when that ship was crippled also, to a shore-based battery. Under these circumstances, Fischer had little control over the situation and Nelson himself was inclined to believe he had surrendered. Though the Danish fleet fought a spirited battle, the much larger British force eventually compelled a ceasefire through one of Fischer's subordinate commanders. Recent histories have posited the difficulty of battle communications and a cumbersome Danish chain of command as reasons for the end of hostilities. Fischer, however, believed otherwise: he swiftly published an official account of the action in which he asserted that the Dano-Norwegian fleet had not in fact been bested, and that the British arrangement of a truce had been a ruse de guerre to mask their retreat. Nelson dismissed these claims vehemently, yet privately admitted that the victory "had not been as complete as he had hoped."

    Later life.

    The tenacious Fischer, who had been wounded in the combat, was revered as a national hero and bemedaled by the Danish crown for his bravery.
    Nelson himself, who had at that time been involved in over a hundred actions, pronounced that the battle was the fiercest he had ever fought.
    Fischer remained with the navy and was elevated to the rank of Vice Admiral. He died on 18 February 1829 and was buried in the churchyard of the Reformed Church, Copenhagen.

    Legacy.

    Although some contemporary scholars have criticized Fischer's reputation and minimized his significance, he remains a military hero in Denmark. Among ships named for him, the coastal defense monitor Olfert Fischer was one of the main ships of the Royal Danish Navy
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Michael Johannes Petronius Bille.


    He was a Danish-Norwegian, and Prussian naval officer born 8 November 1769 in Stege on the Danish Island of Møn into a naval family which had produced and would produce Danish admirals.
    Michael was sailing on the Danish frigate Bornholm (captained by his father Mathias) when it was caught in a hurricane off the Danish West Indies Islands. After days of struggle, the ship ran aground off Newport, County Mayo, Ireland on March 17, 1782. Mathias died in the affair.

    Copenhagen.

    Bille became an officer in the Danish-Norwegian Navy in 1789 and participated in the Battle of Copenhagen on 2 April 1801, where he commanded the lower battery of the Prøvesteenen Kaptain L. F. Lassen, which fired the first shot at the British.
    Over fifteen years he also served as a teacher of mathematics and astronomy at the Seekadettenakademiet (Dansk Søværnets Officersskole).

    From 1807-1811, he served as a captain stationed in Kristiansand in charge of the gunboat squadron (Roflotillen). In 1812-1813 he commanded a French warship in the Scheldt.
    From 1815 he served as pilot inspector in Helsingor until he entered Prussian service in 1820.
    In 1821 he began a very fruitful career as director of the Prussian Navigationsschule in Danzig. After three years he moved the school into a building that lay outside Danzig at the mouth of the Radaune River because the St. Jacob Church was inadequate. The school was then assigned to the war schooner Stralsund commanded by Longé. From 1825 the school also had the gunboat Danzig. Bille and the vessels were under the authority of the Ministry of War in Berlin. This may be seen as the beginning of the Prussian Navy.

    The number of students increased from 40 in 1827 to 115-120 in 1831.
    He resigned from Prussian service 3 May 1838 because he had become a Rear Admiral the Danish Navy, which was also his resignation from the Danish navy.He had performed excellently and was still well remembered in 1897: “A better leader for this branch of navigation at that time would have been difficult to find. The Danish origin was not an obstacle to him while fulfilling his official duties with pleasure and zeal.”.
    As Rear Admiral from 1838 he busied himself with writing and research in natural sciences. In 1840 he published a book on navigation Tankar om och i navigationen. He died in Copenhagen 27 March 1845.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    KomKapt Steen Andersen Bille.

    (1751–1833 was a successful Danish naval officer and a member of the Bille family. He rose to the rank of Admiral and became a Privy Counsellor during the period of Denmark's policy of "armed neutrality" following the Gunboat War with Britain. He was instrumental in the rebuilding of the Danish Navy after 1814.

    Early life.

    Steen Andersen Bille was born on 22 August 1751 in Assens, on the Funen coast of the Little Belt, where his father Rear Admiral Daniel Ernst Bille was then stationed. Steen Andersen Bille became a cadet at the age of eleven, despite being of poor physique, having already experienced a trial voyage in the previous year.
    In 1765, as a cadet, Bille was in the frigate Hvide Ørns when storms and contrary winds held the ship in the Baltic for so long that it was feared the ship would founder – prayers were said in churches around the land for the ship's safety (to good effect, seemingly). As one of the most able cadets of his year, he was promoted to Junior Lieutenant on 16 March 1768, serving then, and again in 1773, in the ship-of-the-line Norske Løve under his father's command.
    On 22 March 1773 he was promoted to Senior Lieutenant. In 1775 he had an independent armed command in the merchant ship Mercurius preventing smuggling to enforce control measures against an outbreak of Rinderpest (Cattle Plague) in Schleswig Holstein.

    The Indies – West and East.

    In 1777 he was posted to the Danish West Indies (DWI) for two years where he became close friends with the Governor General Peter Clausen and two future Governors, Ernst Walterstorff and Peter Oxholm. On his return to Denmark he became second-in-command of the frigate Bornholm, which returned almost immediately to the DWI. Sixty of the crew, including Bille, became sick and were left on St Thomas as the ship escorted a convoy to Guadeloupe. On the way the convoy encountered three British privateers (or pirates) and all the merchant vessels were lost. This upset Bille for a long time afterwards, despite his not being responsible for the loss.

    Commander.

    Bille was promoted to Commander on 18 October 1781 and he was immediately permitted to go on a trading voyage in the Danish East Indiaman Copenhagen, one of the poorest sailing ships the company owned. After a difficult voyage to Holland, Norway and the East Indies he returned successful, but had suffered many fatalities among his crew. On the outward voyage, scurvy had broken out and not one seaman was fit for duty by the time he reached Cape Town. There Bille also broke an arm, which was not set properly and which gave him problems for the rest of his life. Arriving in Bengal, he sent his second officer home in disgrace, for embezzlement!
    For a few years after his return, Bille was in poor health and without a command. During this time he traveled privately to Germany and Paris. Then he received a few commands and at the age of 38 he was promoted to Captain on 6 March 1789. He became flag captain to Admiral von Schindel in Den Prægtige. Later, he commanded Havfruen and other ships.
    As head of cadet training in the frigate Fredericksværn in 1795, he earned his students' undying loyalty by allowing them to eat all they wanted each day. In a test in 1796, racing the old Cronborg against the newly built Najaden, Bille's Cronborg was always the victor. That same year, Bille was flag captain in the squadron of Vice-Admiral F C Kaas.

    In The Mediterranean.

    In the spring of 1797, whilst most of Europe was at war, neutral Denmark had expanded its trade in the Mediterranean and it was necessary for the country's interests to protect this. French, Spanish and British privateers plus Barbary pirates made for uneasy voyages. The Moors had until now been appeased with annual gifts of tribute, but Tripoli now declared war on Denmark, seizing a merchant ship – the Providentia from Bergen – and selling the crew into slavery.
    Bille was given the task of solving the situation and he set sail in Najaden, arriving on 2 May in Malta, where the brig Sarpen and a hired armed xebec were waiting. These ships proceeded to Tripoli harbour where, on 16 May 1797, they successfully fought the Bey of Tunis's ships.
    The ensuing peace treaty was favourable to the Danes, and Bille's squadron continued to provide naval cover for all Danish merchant ships in the Mediterranean. Bille himself was promoted on New Years Day 1798 to senior captain (Danish – KomKapt) and honoured with an appointment as Gentleman-in-waiting to the Danish Court. Diplomacy was high on his agenda (he became the ambassador to Morocco), to protect Danish convoys and to negotiate with the British naval forces and avoid conflict when these forces demanded inspection rights whilst maintaining Denmark's policy of armed neutrality. Bille was recalled from the Mediterranean early in 1801, just as war was about to break out again between Tunis and Denmark.

    Battles of Copenhagen.

    On return to Denmark in 1801, Bille was again in action in the defence of Copenhagen and the fleet anchorage. His position was on the left, i.e. northern, end of the line, which included the ships-of-the-line Danmark and Trekroner, the frigate Iris, brigs Sarpen and Nidelven and a large contingent of gunboats – none of which saw serious action that day. After the battle had been raging on the southern end for close on four hours, the British Rear Admiral Thomas Graves came north with his five ships-of-the-line and ran aground under Trekroner's guns. Before Bille's squadron could launch an attack however, Nelson and the Danish commander negotiated a ceasefire; the British were then able to refloat Admiral Graves's ships and they withdrew.
    On 28 December 1804, with further promotion to Commodore (Kommandør), Bille became deputy in the Admiralty College. He also held positions on the African Consulate Commission, the Quarantine Commission and the Naval Defence Commission.
    As the British navy again threatened in Danish waters in 1807, and the situation became fraught, Bille was named as commander of Danish naval defence under the overall command of General Ernst Peymann. Bille's gunboats did good service against the British naval units and against shore batteries, but Peyman performed poorly against the British army that had landed near Svannemølle and capitulation of Copenhagen became unavoidable. Preparations to sink or burn the Danish fleet at anchor were made, but the expected orders were never received.
    At the capitulation on 7 September 1807, Bille refused to append his signature and sought permission from the crown prince (later Frederick VI) to launch what would be a suicide attack with all available weapons. He is quoted (in translation) as saying "I foresaw that my suggestion would achieve nothing other than my own and my naval warriors honourable deaths. In the meantime we could have won enough time that the Fleet might have been destroyed at its anchorage."[
    On 9 October 1809 Bille was promoted to Rear Admiral.

    After the Gunboat War.

    After the removal by the British of the Danish fleet – the Danish word "Ran" denotes a great deal of bitterness for this episode – Bille was central in organising gunboat resistance to the enemy, and corresponded with many of the naval officers involved. In 1811 he received the Grand Cross of the Order of the Dannebrog for his efforts.
    When Norway was lost to Denmark in the eventual peace, it was Bille who led the attempts to re-establish a Danish navy and with careful financial management establish a reserve fund for the naval service. In 1825 he was promoted to Vice Admiral, and on 1 August 1829 to full Admiral. In 1831 Bille was appointed to the Danish Privy Council.

    Death.

    The monument to Steen Andersen Bille and his wife at Holmens Kirke cemetery, Copenhagen
    “Do right, and fear nobody" was his life's motto. He died 15 April 1833 and is buried in the Holmens Cemetery, Copenhagen. He was survived by four children. His youngest son, also named Steen Andersen Bille, too became a vice admiral.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Peter Willemoes.

    (11 May 1783 – 22 March 1808) was a Danish naval officer.

    Biography.

    Willemoes was born on 11 May 1783 in Assens on the island of Funen, where his father was a public servant. At the age of twelve he was sent to the Naval Academy in Copenhagen, where he was a mediocre student who chafed under and rebelled against the harsh discipline. He became a cadet in 1795 sekondløjtnant in 1800.

    Copenhagen.

    At seventeen he commanded a floating battery, "Flaadebatteri Nr. 1", during the Battle of Copenhagen on 2 April 1801. He had 129 men and 20 cannon under his command and fought with such gallantry that the English Admiral Horatio Nelson commended him to the Crown Prince Frederick after the battle, supposedly recommending that he be promoted to Admiral. To this the Danish prince firmly answered: "If I were to reward all my men for their bravery, I would have a fleet of admirals". After the battle, Willemose became a celebrity and a member of the Danish Order of Freemasons before setting off to the Mediterranean Sea aboard the frigate Rota.
    After his return to Denmark, he began to study law but discontinued his studies in 1807 to briefly go into Russian service.
    After the Bombardment of Copenhagen and the British confiscation of the Danish fleet, he returned to Denmark where he enrolled on Prins Christian Frederik, the only remaining Danish ship-of-the-line. On 22 March 1808, in the Battle of Zealand Point, the ship was driven onto the sandbar by a British . Willemoes was among the 69 Danish casualties, hit by a bullet to his head, and was afterwards buried at Odden Cemetery.

    Reputation and status.

    His indominatable good cheer, courage and good looks combined to make Willemoes an instant celebrity in Northern Europe. Locks of his curly hair became a fashion item among ladies in Copenhagen and he was praised in verse by poet and politician N. F. S. Grundtvig.
    A frigate in the Royal Danish Navy is named for him.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Lorentz Fjelderup Lassen

    (28 November 1756 in Copenhagen - July 27, 1837, Copenhagen) was a Danish naval officer who participated in the Battle of Copenhagen.


    Early Career:
    Lorentz Fjelderup Lassen was the son of lawyer and city bailiff in Copenhagen, Peder Fjelderup Lassen and Sophie Magdalene, born Fisker. He became a second lieutenant in the Navy (1779), a lieutenant (1788), the year after Captain Lieutenant and in 1797 Captain.
    As a young officer, he made expeditions to the West Indies (1781-82) with the frigate Kiel, (1784-86) leads a ship belonging to the West Indies Trading Company and in 1787 with Captain Lieutenant D. Holsten. Among his other expeditions as a subordinate should be mentioned that he was in 1780 with the warship Printz Friderich, which stranded at Læsø, and in 1789 with the warship Nordstjærnen, where he was wounded when a cannon exploded.
    In 1791-92, Lassen was employed with enrollment in Bergen; Upon returning from this he became temporarily master of the navy personnel and material, and later (1795) Vicemaster of the navy personnel and material at Nyholm, as well as (1797), a member of the Copenhagen Harbor Commission. Before 1801, Lassen only had commands on the regulated expeditions with guard ships.

    Battle of Copenhagen:
    In the war preparations, at the beginning of the century, to assert the armed neutrality federation between Russia, Sweden and Denmark, Lassen was employed shortly before the Battle of Copenhagen as head of the block ship, Prøvesteenen of 58 cannons, a ravaged ship of the line (Christian VII), and participated with this in the battle of 2. April 1801 with such excellent valor that his squadron commander, Olfert Fischer, as well as public opinion, awarded him with the award as the most outstanding of all Commanding Officers. His ship, which was the southernmost in the defensive line, opened the battle; It was attacked by ship of the line ships Russel and Polyphemus in addition to a frigate and a brig that pounded Prøvesteenen from fore to aft. Of the 513 men strong crew, for the most part quite untrained people, fell 62, while 40 were wounded. When Lassen only had two useful Cannons left, he left the ship with a part of his crew and let his second in command, Captain-Lieutenant Rasmus Rafn, surrender her to the Englishmen, who later burned the worthless hull.
    Of course, Lassen later received the gold medal that was reminiscent of the battle.

    Later work:
    That same year he was in charge of the cadet frigate Frederiksværn, 1802-3, he led the frigate Rota on a Mediterranean voyage and in 1805 the brig Brevdrageren on an evolution squadron. In 1806, Lassen came out of active service, being employed as the pilot and enrollment director in Frederikshalds district, but already in the following year, during the outbreak of war, he resumed in military operations, organizing the Coastal Defense at the Swedish border, established a signaling system from Hvaløerne to Christiania, as well as commanded the cannon boats and coastal batteries at Idefjord, where he continued to function as long as the war lasted.
    In 1809 he received the commander captain character, three years later he became a true commander; but at Norway's separation from Denmark he returned to Copenhagen. In 1812 he became Knight of Dannebrog. In 1815, when a major reduction took place in the naval officers' corps, Lassen was dismissed with the character of Rear-admiral and full gage, an annual supplement of 300 rdl in retirement; He died in Copenhagen.
    Lassen, about whom Erich Christian Werlauff in his memories recalls, that in the nearest time after 1801 he was the hero of the day wherever he appeared, so that even the fishermen's wives at Gammel Strand stood up and nodded when he crossed the square, missed with his modest and unconditional character quite the ability to act outside of the service area. Lassen was an uncommonly brave, honest and modest man who, after his retirement, lived unnoticed and almost forgotten. He was married to Charlotte, born Nordtmann.
    His tombstone, when his graveyard at Holmen's cemetery expired, was moved to the side of the heroes cemetery.

    Link: https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorentz_Fjelderup_Lassen
    http://denstoredanske.dk/Dansk_Biogr...entz_F._Lassen

  9. #9
    Landsman
    Denmark

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    Oct 2017
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    Copenhagen
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    17
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    Christian

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    Name:  Frederik Christian Riisbrigh.jpg
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    Frederik Christian Riisbrigh

    (by baptism: Friderich Christian Risbrich) (July 13, 1754, in Copenhagen - September 29, 1835, in Svendborg) was a Danish naval officer.

    Early Career:

    He was the son of Commander Volquard Risbrich (1719 - September 14, 1791) and Christiane Sophie born Andresen, became in 1762 volunteer cadet in the Navy, 1768 cadet and 1773 second lieutenant. Already as a cadet, he participated in admiral Frederik Christian Kaas' unfortunate expedition to Algiers 1770-71 and later in a longer Mediterranean journey, where he suffered much harm.

    Career:
    In 1778-83, he spent in the English navy, serving under the famous admirals Rodney and Hood and attended many encounters against the French in West Indian waters.
    Upon his return, In 1780, he had become a premier lieutenant, in recognition of his good relationship, lieutenant captain and appointed Adjutant General. After some voyages with the annual equipped squadrons, he spent 1787-88 in Bergen with his father and became a captain in 1790; was in 1795 head of the frigate St. Thomas as a warship in Sundet; He had the bad luck breaking his leg, which put him out of active service until 1801. This year he received the command of the blockship Wagrien and participated in the Olfert Fischer's fight on Reden against Nelson on April 2. He fought against the line ships Isis and Bellona in addition to several smaller ones; Of his crew of 286 men fell 69, and 48 were injured; when the ship finally became quite staggered, Riisbrigh spiked the cannons, threw the gunpowder overboard and left Wagrien with so many people the boats could accommodate; The broken hull was later burned by the enemy.
    In December of the same year, he was promoted to Commander Captain. In 1802 he received the Remembrance Medal for the Battle of Copenhagen.

    Later Career:
    In 1804, he married widow Mariane Beck, born Nellemann (dead 1828), with whom he acquired some fortune and lived in a happy but childless marriage.
    In 1808 he traveled to Aalborg, from which he led Norway's supply with provision; As a member of the provisioning commission, he remained here until 1814.
    In 1809 he became a commander, 28th January 1810, Knight of the Dannebrog, 1813 Rear admiral and 31st of July 1815, Commander of Dannebrog. At the 1815 navy reduction, he retired but received a new resignation patent in 1833 as Vice Admiral. After his departure, he settled in Svendborg, where he died on September 29, 1835.
    Riisbrigh was an uncommonly gracious and modest character, calm and cold-blooded in the face of danger; His many good qualities made him honored and well-liked where he came.
    He is buried at Svendborg Old Cemetery.

  10. #10
    Master & Commander
    UK

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    Feb 2013
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    Northumberland
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    Neil

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    Fantastic information Rob. Nice background stuff for anyone wanting to run a mini campaign or command the Danish/Norwegians.

  11. #11
    Landsman
    Denmark

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    Oct 2017
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    Copenhagen
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    Christian

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    Name:  Christian Thestrup Egede1.jpg
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    Christian Thestrup Egede

    (1761-1803), naval officer. Born in Copenhagen, died the same place, buried the same place (Holmen).

    Career:
    Egede came into the Navy as a volunteer at the age of nine, became in 1774 cadet, 1782 second Lieutenant, 1789 premier lieutenant, 1796 captains lieutenant and 1801 captain.
    In 1781-82 he was with the ship of the line Wagrien in Ostindia and 1782-83 with the frigate Cronborg in the West Indies.
    In 1786, he became next in command on the yacht 'Den ny Prøve' and participated in Poul Løvenørn's expedition to the east coast of Greenland, to find 'Østerbygden', which was once believed to be situated there. However, when Løvenørn, already at the end of July, gave up the battle with the DenmarkStrait ice masses, Egede was stationed in Iceland to continue the trials. Already the same autumn, he boldly pushed so far forward to reach the east coast, that he was near 2½ miles to the east coast, close to Cape Dan where A. E. Norden-skiöld landed in 1883 but could not climb the coastal ice belt. In 1787 he repeated the experiments several times, now accompanied by the ship Hvidfisken, but had to give up to the ice masses in the autumn. He discovered Egedes and Rothes Fjord and took coastal diagrams of the country between 65 and 66½ ° north latitude. His observations he revealed in the description of travel to East Greenland's discovery 1786-87, with maps and prospects 1789 (2nd edition 1796).
    In 1793, Egede went to Dutch service and recognized himself as head of the cannon boats at the Zuijdersoen.
    Went in to service again in 1794 and was first rolling officer in Ringkøbing until 1797, and then had different commands.
    Attended the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801 where he commanded the barge Rendsborg and where he excelled in heroism; when the anchor rope was shot, he put the ship aground and continued shooting until he had to surrender after four hours of battle. Already next year he was released, what was partly because he was a bad economist. Egede again intended to go abroad but died before.

    Family:
    Parents: Pastor, Later Bishop, Professor Poul Egede (1708-89) and Maria C. Thestrup (1735-68).
    Marriage: 1798 in Nørre Vedby with Magdalene (Lene) Barbara Budtz, (1762-1838), daughter of administrator Mikkel (Michael) Budtz (1724-86) and Johanne Dorthea (Sophie) Wedege (1738-83). The marriage was dissolved.


    http://denstoredanske.dk/Dansk_Biogr...er/C._T._Egede
    Last edited by Cloen; 11-01-2017 at 18:20.

  12. #12
    Landsman
    Denmark

    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    Copenhagen
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    17
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    Christian

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    Name:  Erich Otto Knoph Branth.jpg
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    Erich "Erik" Otto Knoph Branth
    (March 14, 1756, in Sandvær, Norway - August 6, 1825, in Aarhus) was a Danish-Norwegian naval officer.

    Career:
    Cadet in 1769 and advanced through the various degrees, a second lieutenant in 1775, lieutenant in 1781, lieutenant-captain in 1789, a captain in 1796, commander-captain in 1803 until he became commander in 1811.

    cowberry War:
    Branth was in 1779 with the ship of the line Elephanten in squadron, in 1780 with the ship of the line Justitia in squadron, 1781-82 with the frigate Kiel to the West Indies, in 1784 second in command of Kiel in Squadron, 1788 on the ship of the line Princess Lovisa Augusta in squadron, then the same year as a lieutenant employed by the Norwegian cannon flotilla under Rear-admiral Jacob Arenfeldts command and commander of a platoon insert boats that supported the army incursions of Norway in Sweden.
    He was in 1789 deployment officer in Moss and the same year with the ship of the line Den Prægtige in squadron, in 1790 second in command of the frigate Havfruen in squadron, in 1791 with the the ship of the line Kronprins Frederik in squadron, in 1794 with the ship of the line Princess Sophie Friderica in squadron, then second in command of the ship of the line Odin in Squadron, 1795 as second in command of the the ship of the line Dannebrog in squadron, in 1796 head of the royal yacht Søormen, guard ship in the Great Belt and in 1800 second in command of the ship of the line Princess Sophie Friderica in squadron.

    Battle of Copenhagen:
    In the Battle of Copenhagen April 2, 1801, as the captain of the blockship Jutland of 54 guns and 425 men; The ship was attacked by the English ship of the line Ardent and Russel and two Briggs. Branth, however, defended himself bravely; only when all the guns except four were dismantled and 100 men dead or wounded, he stroked and came in captivity. The ship was later looted and burned. In 1802 he received the Commemorative Medal for the Battle of Copenhagen. In 1803, Branth led the frigate Freia and later the frigate Iris on the Mediterranean voyage. Two years later he had his last command, the brig Glommen in a squadron. In 1808 he was appointed the commander of Copenhagen Customs House and 1810 member of the Price Court. In 1812, he was employed as deployment chief and pilot of East Jutland, residing in Aarhus where he remained until his death on August 6, 1825.
    He got married in 1797 with Nicoline Elisabeth Cathrine Behr (1778-1853), daughter of proprietor Niels Behr to Skaføgård (1717-1778) and wife Anna Dorthea born Hansen (1743-?).
    He is buried in Aarhus.

    Family:

    Parents: factory owner and forest owner, later magazine manager - and coin checker Kay Branth (1722-1789) and Olea Knoph (1728-1820).

    Link: https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Branth
    http://denstoredanske.dk/Dansk_Biogr...er/Erik_Branth

  13. #13
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Admiral
    England

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    Nov 2011
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    Notts
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    Rob

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    Thanks for these extra two additions Christian.
    Much appreciated.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  14. #14
    Landsman
    Denmark

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    Oct 2017
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    Copenhagen
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    Christian

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    Name:  hauch_jens_erik.jpg
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    Jens Erik Hauch
    (November 23, 1765, at Højris - April 2, 1801, in Copenhagen) was a Danish naval officer.

    Career:
    His parents were an official and Council of State, later governor and King's counselor Frederik Hauch (1715-1789) and Nicoline Dorothea Vind (1734-1788). Hauch was a cadet in 1778, attended the Naval Academy in 1780, but was delayed here a part of his education. He became first, second-lieutenant in 1789 and then first-lieutenant 1794. The following year he obtained the command of the in Frederiksstad stationed vessels and remained there for a time.
    When Denmark, at the beginning of 1801, prepared to defend the capital against attacks by the English, he was appointed as head of the withdrawn frigate Kronborg of 26 guns belonging to the floating defension. He participated with honor in the Battle of Copenhagen April 2, fought at once with three English frigates and later with two of the enemy ships of the line and fell along with 30 men of its crew; The ship was conquered by the Englishmen but was so damaged that it had to be burned.
    Hauch was unmarried. He is buried at the warrior grave at Holmen's Cemetery.

  15. #15
    Landsman
    Denmark

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    Oct 2017
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    Copenhagen
    Log Entries
    17
    Name
    Christian

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    Name:  Ferdinand Braun.jpg
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    Ferdinand Albrecht Braun
    September 7, 1756 - December 19, 1813, Born in Fredensborg, died at Frederiks Hospital in Copenhagen, buried at Holmen Cemetery. Naval officer.

    Early career:
    Braun became a cadet in 1765, second lieutenant in 1774, a lieutenant in 1781, lieutenant-captain in 1788 and captain 1796. 1780-81 he was on board the ship of the line Indfødsretten on convoy travel to Cape Town, 1794-95 commander of the brig Nidelven and 1797-98 commander of the frigate Iris, both to the West Indies.

    Battle of Copenhagen:
    In 1801 he was head of the blockship Dannebrog, 60 cannons, where Olfert Fischer had raised his stand until the ship was shot on fire. During the battle, Dannebrog was especially engaged by Lord Nelson's Admiral Ship Elephant, 74 cannons, Glatton, 54 cannons, and Ganges, 74 cannons. After about one and a half hours battle, a fire broke out on board Dannebrog and Olfert Fischer moved his stand to the ship of the line Holstein, while Braun continued for some time, until he hard wounded had to surrender the command to the second in command captain Lemming. At 12:30, when there were only three usable guns, Lemming stroked the flag after sending about 150 men ashore while the others were caught. Dannebrog drove burning north and blew up at 16.45 a little north of Trekroner. Braun who lost his right hand as a result of his wound received the memorial medal in gold. He was dismissed in 1802 with full pay in retirement and the commander captain's character. He was in 1787 chairman of the Sealieutnants association.

    Family:
    Parents: Attorney General, Life Surgeon Simon Gottfried Braun (1702-72) and Frederikke Lovise Gundelach (approx. 1717-67).
    Unmarried.

    Link: http://denstoredanske.dk/Dansk_Biogr...erdinand_Braun

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