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7eat51
02-03-2013, 17:10
Which is your favorite naval book series?

Coog
02-04-2013, 02:43
My favorite fiction series is Privateers and Gentlemen by Jon Williams. The first book is set during the American War of Independence and the following four during the War of 1812.

Volunteer
02-04-2013, 05:53
I like the Dewey Lambdin books with Alan Lewrie as the rakish main character. I have also read two of Sean Thomas Russels books about his hero Charles Hayden which I liked a lot. Both authors cover real historical events in great detail in their books maiking them especially interesting. And of course I do like Patrick O'Brien but sometimes they drag and don't contain enough real historical events. They do give a real flavor of the times though. Forrester was just a little too pulpy for my taste, though I read them all.

7eat51
02-05-2013, 11:02
Has anyone ever read this series? I don't quite know what to make of it.

The Temeraire series of novels by Naomi Novik is composed of His Majesty's Dragon (released as Temeraire in the United Kingdom), Throne of Jade, Black Powder War, Empire of Ivory, Victory of Eagles, and Tongues of Serpents. The novels are works of both fantasy and alternate history: they are "a reimagining of the epic events of the Napoleonic Wars with an air force — an air force of dragons, manned by crews of aviators". (From wikipedia)

Horatio
02-06-2013, 13:02
I've only read the Hornblower series haven't heard of any of the others

David Manley
02-07-2013, 04:12
I voted for Bolitho. that said the Ramage series is excellent too. Heck, they are all good!

Volunteer
02-07-2013, 11:32
I read the first Temeraire book His Majesty's Dragon a while back. It was ok, but I was just getting into the Aubrey / Maturan series and never picked up the next book in the series. What did you think of them Eric?

7eat51
02-07-2013, 13:44
I never heard of them before. I imagine they are definitely a different type of read from the other series - basically fun on a rainy day.


I read the first Temeraire book His Majesty's Dragon a while back. It was ok, but I was just getting into the Aubrey / Maturan series and never picked up the next book in the series. What did you think of them Eric?

7eat51
02-07-2013, 13:49
This is one of the reasons I started this poll - to be introduced to new series. Ramage is now on my "to get" list along with Privateers and Gentlemen and the Hayden series.


I voted for Bolitho. that said the Ramage series is excellent too. Heck, they are all good!

7eat51
02-07-2013, 13:50
I've only read the Hornblower series haven't heard of any of the others

Would I assume correctly that you watched the Hornblower series as well? I thought they were excellent.

Volunteer
02-08-2013, 08:49
Absolutely Eric. They are excellent. I also have the original Gregory Peck movie, Billy Budd, and of course Master and Commander. I really wish someone would produce some more of them.

Jack Aubrey
02-09-2013, 05:26
Hi,
for me Aubrey/maturin please.....
Greeting Jack

7eat51
02-18-2013, 23:58
Is anyone familiar with the Nathaniel Drinkwater series?

Coog
02-19-2013, 00:06
Is anyone familiar with the Nathaniel Drinkwater series?

I can't recall the series. I found this link listing the books of the series and the titles look interesting. Also they look fairly inexpensive on eBay. I'll have to get one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Drinkwater

Jack Aubrey
02-19-2013, 05:37
No Sir, but I will try it at the next one

Volunteer
02-19-2013, 21:40
I just bought 6 of the Alexander Kent's Bolitho Series at a used bookstore yesterday.

Comte de Brueys
02-21-2013, 09:59
Horatio Hornblower is my favourite.

HMS Lydia
03-08-2013, 11:55
I guess by my handle, obviously Horatio Hornblower is my favorite. The Jack Aubrey books are excellent also. I envision Hornblower as the Richard Sharpe of the sea. I like the way C.S. Forester starts the character as a Midshipman and takes you all the way through his long and sometimes inactive career.

Wartrain
03-09-2013, 04:18
I have to go with the Aubrey/Maturin series. There the only ones i've read any of.

Berthier
03-09-2013, 18:57
I've read the Bolitho, Hornblower, Aubrey/Martin, Novak (some), Dudley Pope and a couple of the Kydd series. Novak's is just fantasy in an historical setting, I got through two of them and gave up not because they were bad but rather they didn't meet my interest. Hornblower novels are classics and as such are written in a style that is a little dated but still excellent, Bolitho (by Alexander Kent which I think is a pseudonym of Douglas Reeman?) were favorites when I was younger but probably went belong their design life! Aubrey/Martin novels are great literature, highly detailed but can be slow at times nevertheless I think they give an excellent feel for the period.

Sea Gull
03-13-2013, 15:13
Hornblower for me.

Diamondback
03-13-2013, 22:44
Other: Conways's nonfiction Anatomy of the Ship series, rivaled by their All The World's Fighting Ships and MJ Whitley's _____ of World War II encyclopedias. I'm more interested in the structures and engineering end, though, particularly what influences went into each new design and what was a copy or evolution of what.

7eat51
03-14-2013, 13:28
I can't recall the series. I found this link listing the books of the series and the titles look interesting. Also they look fairly inexpensive on eBay. I'll have to get one.

I just picked these up on amazon in five omnibus editions - extremely inexpensive this way.


Other: Conways's nonfiction Anatomy of the Ship series, rivaled by their All The World's Fighting Ships and MJ Whitley's _____ of World War II encyclopedias. I'm more interested in the structures and engineering end, though, particularly what influences went into each new design and what was a copy or evolution of what.

Just looked up the Anatomy of the Ship series on amazon. Looks good, though some of the reviews on the Constitution were a bit disappointing. If you have the one on the Constitution, I would appreciate hearing your opinion.

pward
04-14-2013, 14:50
Aubrey/Maturin... I'm on book 10.

Naharaht
04-14-2013, 22:43
I read the Hornblower books when I was young. I then discoverd Bolitho and Ramage and latterly the Aubrey/ Maturin Chronicles. I am not sure that it is fair to compare Hornblower with Richard Sharpe because Hornblower never was the 'rough diamond' that Sharpe was. If all the fictional characters had been real, then the French and Spanish navies would have been sunk or captured several times over.

Chanfan
04-22-2013, 16:50
Interesting to see folks takes on it. I voted Aubrey/Maturin, as that's the one that sinks me into the period the most successfully. Hornblower is a close second - it's more action/adventure-ish to me, but was my first exposure, and I have a great love for it. I think I tried one Ramage, and didn't care for it - and at some point (fairly or not) got it stuck in my head that Ramage/Bolitho etc. were poor seconds, not worth pursuing. I also dipped my toe in one series on a privateer in the American Revolution, but cannot recall which author that was.

I have devoured the whole of the Sharpe series, which I do feel is more in the same ballpark with Hornblower.

As for the Temeraire series, I got sucked into them. I am separately a fan of Sci-Fi/Fantasy. My view is that Naomi Novik is a good, but not astounding writer. If they were just fantasy, I have other, better reviewed series competing for my attention. If they were just historical fiction, I suspect I'd prefer one of the other authors already below my cut off line.

But, like Peanut Butter and Chocolate, somehow the combination of Age of Sail and Fantasy just worked for me, becoming better than the sum of it's parts. I've picked up and read all the books she's released to date, and plan to continue doing so.


I'd put out one non-series book as recommended: Doctor Dogbody's Leg by James Norman Hall (yes, one of the co-authors of Mutiny on the Bounty). Absolutely hilarious book wherein the titular character regales the denizens of his local pub about how he lost his larboard leg - about 10 times, in 10 different short stories. Apparently out of print, but was reprinted in 1998 as part of the Heart of Oak Sea Classics series.

Oh, and my father loved Hornblower, but especially the O'Brian series. He would continually re-read them - starting over as he finished them - he must have read them about five or six times, at least.

Diamondback
04-22-2013, 17:50
Just looked up the Anatomy of the Ship series on amazon. Looks good, though some of the reviews on the Constitution were a bit disappointing. If you have the one on the Constitution, I would appreciate hearing your opinion.
Do not have that one--but the one on Victory is superb, and the one on Bellona was a HUGE help on sorting out Slade's 74's--if McKay is comfortable with calling Culloden at 1' greater each length and beam a "near sister" to Bellona, then I'm comfortable using it as a reprint, and I wish all their other authors would go as in-depth about design and engineering, and especially related designs, as he does.

CHolgren
04-23-2013, 20:21
Haven't read any naval series, but I'm glad to take all the advice and educate myself with them.

Gunner
06-06-2013, 18:55
Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series is my favorite so far. Has anyone read anything from the Kydd series?

Cmmdre
06-08-2013, 22:38
Choosing just one is too difficult. All of the above should also be an option in this poll. :hmmm:

berlichtingen
06-11-2013, 23:57
I've enjoyed all that have been mentioned (with the notable exception of the Aubrey/Maturin series), but there's a special place in my heart for the rakehell Alan Lewrie

Gunner
06-12-2013, 01:18
Never read anything on Alan Lewrie. Thought I'd see if I liked it, so I just ordered The Kings Coat.

Berthier
06-12-2013, 04:19
Hey Ed
I have just about finished my first novel of Alan Lewrie the one you have just ordered. I feel pretty confident you will enjoy it, more accessible than Aubrey, more modern than Hornblower, better written than Bolitho and a lot of fun to read. I will be getting more in the series soon!

Cmmdre
06-12-2013, 08:54
I've enjoyed all that have been mentioned (with the notable exception of the Aubrey/Maturin series), but there's a special place in my heart for the rakehell Alan Lewrie


Never read anything on Alan Lewrie. Thought I'd see if I liked it, so I just ordered The Kings Coat.


Hey Ed
I have just about finished my first novel of Alan Lewrie the one you have just ordered. I feel pretty confident you will enjoy it, more accessible than Aubrey, more modern than Hornblower, better written than Bolitho and a lot of fun to read. I will be getting more in the series soon!

I'll be looking into getting these as well. Thank you all for the recommendations. :happy:

berlichtingen
06-12-2013, 10:00
Alan Lewrie is a bit Hornblower, and a bit Flashman

calm
06-17-2013, 07:33
Haven't read any naval series, but I'm glad to take all the advice and educate myself with them.

Exactly my case.

But already bought the hornblower series for my kindle.

calm
06-17-2013, 07:38
Hey Ed
I have just about finished my first novel of Alan Lewrie the one you have just ordered. I feel pretty confident you will enjoy it, more accessible than Aubrey, more modern than Hornblower, better written than Bolitho and a lot of fun to read. I will be getting more in the series soon!

Berthier,

From the Amazon website I got the impression that "The King's Commission: An Alan Lewrie Naval Adventure (Alan Lewrie Naval Adventures)" was the first book in the series. Have you read it ?

7eat51
06-17-2013, 07:54
Hey Ed
I have just about finished my first novel of Alan Lewrie the one you have just ordered. I feel pretty confident you will enjoy it, more accessible than Aubrey, more modern than Hornblower, better written than Bolitho and a lot of fun to read. I will be getting more in the series soon!

That is high praise. Another series to get.

On a side note, Bob (BBSuds) and I were walking around at Origins this past week, and Ioan Gruffudd, the actor who played Hornblower in the A&E series, walked past us. We both thought he looked taller onscreen.

Berthier
06-17-2013, 08:03
Hi Carlos , that is the 3rd book in the series, the first is THe King's Coat. This is the list in order

http://www.fictiondb.com/author/dewey-lambdin~series~the-naval-adventures-of-alan-lewrie~9664.htm

calm
06-17-2013, 08:17
Hi Carlos , that is the 3rd book in the series, the first is THe King's Coat. This is the list in order

http://www.fictiondb.com/author/dewey-lambdin~series~the-naval-adventures-of-alan-lewrie~9664.htm

Thanks for the clarification Berthier :wink:

Then I can start the series in the right place. 20 books !!! For me it is a treasure, as I have the need for many books starting in july :happy:

Cmmdre
06-17-2013, 08:41
Thanks for the clarification Berthier :wink:

Then I can start the series in the right place. 20 books !!! For me it is a treasure, as I have the need for many books starting in july :happy:

Why July Carlos? :question:

calm
06-17-2013, 08:49
Why July Carlos? :question:

I will be sent to the middle of the Amazon Forest, for at least four months.

The base there don't have telephones or internet, just radios. And the nearer internet conection point is a 4 hour trip, so, many, many books in my kindle is a must.

7eat51
06-17-2013, 08:52
Here's wishing you a safe time Carlos.

calm
06-17-2013, 09:30
Here's wishing you a safe time Carlos.

Thank you.

I will be in contact with every kind of insect, that byte, sting and burn, not counting drug dealers in the indian territory. Oh and snakes and jaguars, too, among many beatiful birds.

But I have a good dependable team, this follow on trip should not be difficult, we already busted the more dangerous gangs earlier this year.

Gunner
06-17-2013, 11:52
Sounds more like a mission than a trip. Can you mention the reason for the trip?

Cmmdre
06-17-2013, 11:56
I understand now. Wow, 4 months at a remote post in the sweltering jungle. Good luck with that. Too bad you don't have a copy of SOG to bring with you.

calm
06-17-2013, 13:24
Sounds more like a mission than a trip. Can you mention the reason for the trip?

No problem, it is not a secret.

Dismantle drug dealing gangs in the central region of the Amazon Forest, and get non-indian out of indian territory. As a note, I don't like dealing with indians, but...


I understand now. Wow, 4 months at a remote post in the sweltering jungle. Good luck with that. Too bad you don't have a copy of SOG to bring with you.

No way to get anything more than my laptop, kindle and some clothes there, I could trade some ammo or food space for a game, but I don't think this would be wise :sad:

But aside from staying away from family (She who sees all, included) it is not that bad. It is just that I am getting old for this kind of work :wink:

I tend to think of it like an adventure :happy:

And as I missed the KS Project, I already arranged the SoG to be shipped to my friends house in my absence :embarass:

calm
06-17-2013, 13:33
A five foot "tall" snake.

5540

Not a venomous one, but lots of bacteria in its mouth, so, no playing with it :wink:

Volunteer
06-24-2013, 00:21
I have now read 3 of the 6 Bolitho books that I bought and I am sorry to say that, while I liked them alright, they just don't hold a candle to the Charles Hayden and Alan Lewrie novels.

7eat51
06-24-2013, 08:49
A five foot "tall" snake.

We call that soup-starter.

Cmmdre
06-24-2013, 08:53
I have now read 3 of the 6 Bolitho books that I bought and I am sorry to say that, while I liked them alright, they just don't hold a candle to the Charles Hayden and Alan Lewrie novels.

Thank you for helping me organize/prioritize my reading list Vol.

Gunner
06-24-2013, 09:05
We call that soup-starter.

Looks like the whole meal to me.

7eat51
06-24-2013, 09:21
Looks like the whole meal to me.

I have enjoyed every snake meal I have had. The best was cobra soup.

calm
06-24-2013, 11:37
I have enjoyed every snake meal I have had. The best was cobra soup.

This one got away because we were at the beggining of the mission, it would rot before we could cook it :)

Coog
06-24-2013, 14:39
Reminds me of a movie scene:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MgyRO3c870

Cmmdre
06-29-2013, 23:50
Some reference links to information on some of these book series. :thumbsup:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Aubrey%E2%80%93Maturin_series
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey%E2%80%93Maturin_series
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Hornblower
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Marryat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolitho_series
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Drinkwater
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Lewrie

Hobbes
08-20-2013, 05:50
I have to vote for the Hornblower series, since I don't know any of the other.

I just listened to the audiobook of "Mr. Midshipman Hornblower", which to be honest I didn't like very much. After reading a comment on Amazon, I gave "Lieutenant Hornblower" a try and this is a really good book.

So take the hint and do not start with Mr. Midshipman Hornblower. Watch the movies "Even Chance", "The frogs and the lobsters", "The examination for Lt." and "The dutchess and the devil", they are much better than the respective chapter in the book.

Capn Duff
10-20-2013, 07:36
CSForrester for me

Capn Duff
10-20-2013, 07:36
CS Forrester for me

7eat51
11-30-2013, 08:49
A few of you mentioned the Sharpe series, so I have kept an eye open for them. The other day, I looked at the books for sale at our local library, and found four of the series, brand new, for a buck apiece. Fortunately, I have the first three of the chronological order. Something fun to read in the new year.

Cmmdre
11-30-2013, 08:53
A few of you mentioned the Sharpe series, so I have kept an eye open for them. The other day, I looked at the books for sale at our local library, and found four of the series, brand new, for a buck apiece. Fortunately, I have the first three of the chronological order. Something fun to read in the new year.

Nice score Eric. :thumbsup:

7eat51
11-30-2013, 09:03
Nice score Eric. :thumbsup:

There is a section in the library that has an ongoing book sale. PB for $1 and HB for $3. Not only can you find good deals, but support the library at the same time. I have picked up quite a few good titles during the past few months. Recently, someone must have cleared out part of his/her ACW library; ironically, the exact same titles were added to my own. Hmmm.

Cmmdre
11-30-2013, 09:33
There is a section in the library that has an ongoing book sale. PB for $1 and HB for $3. Not only can you find good deals, but support the library at the same time. I have picked up quite a few good titles during the past few months. Recently, someone must have cleared out part of his/her ACW library; ironically, the exact same titles were added to my own. Hmmm.

Good for everyone all around. I have to keep my book buying in check these days. Both space and budget are considerations for me. I could easily spend a lifetime in used bookstores, libraries, reading rooms. Once on a roadtrip my wife and I discovered a little book seller in Coos Bay Oregon that had a great selection, cozy parlor and fishbowl sized coffee cups. I didn't want to leave. :cry:

Gunner
11-30-2013, 09:44
I must have watched the 14 original and the two newer Sharpe's DVD's three times already.:happy:

7eat51
11-30-2013, 09:49
Good for everyone all around. I have to keep my book buying in check these days. Both space and budget are considerations for me. I could easily spend a lifetime in used bookstores, libraries, reading rooms. Once on a roadtrip my wife and I discovered a little book seller in Coos Bay Oregon that had a great selection, cozy parlor and fishbowl sized coffee cups. I didn't want to leave. :cry:

I know what you mean, especially about space. It's hard to resist, though, $0.01 amazon prices and library sales. It doesn't help with folks posting so many good reads.

If you're ever in Chicago, I would very much like to show you around, including a couple of great used bookstores - just a little indulgence.

Unfortunately, I fear used bookstores will become more scarce, especially ones with spaces like you described. As much as I appreciate technological advancement, I enjoy holding an actual book.

Cmmdre
11-30-2013, 10:05
I know what you mean, especially about space. It's hard to resist, though, $0.01 amazon prices and library sales. It doesn't help with folks posting so many good reads.

If you're ever in Chicago, I would very much like to show you around, including a couple of great used bookstores - just a little indulgence.

Unfortunately, I fear used bookstores will become more scarce, especially ones with spaces like you described. As much as I appreciate technological advancement, I enjoy holding an actual book.

Especially when you discover a period of time that appeals to you which you hadn't previously looked at very closely. I have been indulging in online book buying, as you say it is hard to resist, like a control study animal in a cage with a gratification button.

I'm not sure I have enough vacation time saved up to be able to take you up on your invitation as pleasant as it sounds. :happy:

I agree that small booksellers are fading fast like many other niche stores like hobby/game shops, drugstores, etc...

Like the end of the age of sail we are witnessing a charge in times whose course and outcomes are unknown to us. Going back to the way it was is not an option.

csadn
12-02-2013, 01:45
Once on a roadtrip my wife and I discovered a little book seller in Coos Bay Oregon that had a great selection, cozy parlor and fishbowl sized coffee cups. I didn't want to leave. :cry:

A comfy used bookstore in Oregon? I didn't know such existed up here.

[WARNING! TOXIC LEVELS OF SARCASM DETECTED! EVACUATE THREAD IMMEDIATELY!]

:)

RichardPF
12-02-2013, 03:55
A comfy used bookstore in Oregon? I didn't know such existed up here.

[WARNING! TOXIC LEVELS OF SARCASM DETECTED! EVACUATE THREAD IMMEDIATELY!]

:)

At the Starbucks Coffee gear store at the headquarters store in Seattle where they experiment with non perishable items to sell in their coffee shops,
it is rumored that they have introduced a small line of books.

They are calling it:
The circle of life... (http://www.starbucksstore.com/music-more/music-and-books,default,sc.html)

csadn
12-02-2013, 18:44
They are calling it:
The circle of life... (http://www.starbucksstore.com/music-more/music-and-books,default,sc.html)

<- hums a few bars of "Will The Circle Be Unbroken" >;)

Cmmdre
12-02-2013, 19:11
<- hums a few bars of "Will The Circle Be Unbroken" >;)

Probably the greatest album ever.

That is if you're talking bluegrass.

Old Salt
11-21-2014, 09:22
Horatio Hornblower is my favourite.

Mine also

Union Jack
11-23-2014, 09:41
At present, Bolitho, as it is the only full series I've read. Just started on the Jack Aubrey books though, only read one and it is just as good.

David Manley
11-23-2014, 09:51
There's a chap here working his way through Jack Aubrey scenarios on the tabletop :)

http://hordesofthethings.blogspot.com.au/2014/11/sophie-and-algerine.html

Danath
11-24-2014, 08:51
I voted for O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series. That said, I have enjoyed the three or four Hornblower novels that I've gotten through, as well as the first of the Temeraire books. I have the Bolitho and Ramage series on my Amazon wishlist, and will now be adding a few others as well.

Of course, I should probably finish off the last three Sharpe novels before I get sucked into another series or three. Maybe the next deployment will see me through a series.

RotS-Targe
11-27-2014, 21:24
Other: Conways's nonfiction Anatomy of the Ship series, rivaled by their All The World's Fighting Ships and MJ Whitley's _____ of World War II encyclopedias. I'm more interested in the structures and engineering end, though, particularly what influences went into each new design and what was a copy or evolution of what.

I will need to get a few of these... my interest in ships is very much based on the technical aspects of them (to the point I'm studying to design ships), so, these sound like some excellent light reading.

7eat51
11-27-2014, 23:22
There's a chap here working his way through Jack Aubrey scenarios on the tabletop :)

http://hordesofthethings.blogspot.com.au/2014/11/sophie-and-algerine.html

Thanks for sharing the blog link, David. I just mentioned on another thread about a platform with row boats, and in this engagement, the player used such a mini. I need to find some of them.

Diamondback
12-03-2014, 15:23
I will need to get a few of these... my interest in ships is very much based on the technical aspects of them (to the point I'm studying to design ships), so, these sound like some excellent light reading.
Targe, you will find the AOTS volume on HMS Bellona supremely helpful, then--it gives very nice illustration of why Ares was so comfortable putting representatives from so many different classes on one sculpt.

Mycenius
03-23-2015, 02:50
I've only read the Hornblower series haven't heard of any of the others

Same here - gotta vote Hornblower, but partly 'cause it's the only one I've read enough of! :wink:

Bligh
03-23-2015, 05:02
Hornblower, simply because it was the first intro I had to the Napoleonic Navys at a very early age.
Also I want action packed adventures, and not the sheer tedium of the Aubrey/ Maturin books where an outcome can take several volumes to unfold.
Bligh.

Grognard
04-05-2015, 02:00
Hello All.

Are any of these books written from the French or Spanish points of view?

Bligh
04-05-2015, 02:16
Firstly me welcome you aboard John.
I am not aware that these books are slanted toward the French point of view, but then I am not familiar with all of them.
I'm sure that a more knowledgeable shipmate will be along soon with more information.
Bligh.

Volunteer
04-05-2015, 08:30
Hello All.

Are any of these books written from the French or Spanish points of view?

Unfortunately no. And please let me echo Rob's welcome.

Coog
04-05-2015, 20:05
There are two novels set during the Battle of Trafalgar by Spanish authors, Cabo Trafalgar by Arturo Pérez-Reverte and Trafalgar by Benito Pérez Galdós.

Here is a link to a review:

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/785451952

I noticed one or both books available for free as an e-book or audio book.

Bligh
04-06-2015, 02:58
Started reading the Ramage books by Dudley Pope (not mentioned in the survey) on my Kindle whilst I was on the Courts Martial.
Quite enjoying them so far. I'm now on the second one.
Bligh.

Dr.Maturin
02-29-2016, 04:06
The Jack Aubrey novels by Patrick O'Brian with good old Hornblower a close second.

Torrence
02-29-2016, 04:58
I agree, the Aubrey-Maturin-Series is brilliant! So far I've read all books in German (quite well translated, only some measures and numbers seemed a bit off to me), most multiple times, and some weeks ago a friend borrowed me the first 11 books in English.

Bligh
02-29-2016, 05:32
The Jack Aubrey novels by Patrick O'Brian with good old Hornblower a close second.

I would never have guessed Reg.:wink:
I must give them another go sometime.
Rob.